Nonfiction

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As fascinating as it is, we tend to take our solar system for granted. After all, from our puny human perspective, the local astronomical real estate doesn’t change much.

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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After an economic meltdown, a decade of war in the Middle East, and an Old Testament geyser in the gulf, we face a fork in the road of our national journey: Are our institutions—be they government,

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This begins as an excellent biography of a woman who might have remained unknown but for a miracle of medicine.

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“Maybe he realized . . . the utter aloneness of the fighter—despite the hangers-on, the crowds, the adulation, it was a pitiless profession.”

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Reading a book about the art of writing by horror master Stephen King is like sitting down with your favorite uncle to talk about how to fix cars.

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The latest edition of the Legal Guide for the Visual Artist is more than just the fifth edition of the venerable tome; it is also the fifth edition of the book that author Tad Crawford fir

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In Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women, Rebecca Traister follows key women involved in the 2008 Presidential election, to tell the story “about the country

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A sequel to Dewey: The Small Town Library Cat Who Touched the World, this book is reminiscent of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series. Ms. Myron and Mr.

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“Fenway Park, in Boston, is a little lyric bandbox of a ballpark,” begins the tale of Red Sox slugger Ted Williams’ final at bat on September 28, 1960, at the oldest major league baseball stadium c

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“I have always preferred,” wrote the French 19th century author Anatole France, “the folly of passion to the wisdom of indifference.”

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Cowboy Conservatism is an illuminating history of modern conservatism in the state of Texas—a conservatism that spread throughout the United States, but that began with a bullet that took

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In 1990 Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar wrote Barbarians at the Gate, the account of the leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco.

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Welcome to Redneck economics and philosophy. If Mr. and Ms.

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Americans viewing those old and trite film shots of people lounging around languidly in opium dens, powerless to escape from their drugged reveries, used to feel scorn for those addicts.

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The Icarus Syndrome uses the Greek myth of Icarus to illustrate American foreign policy shortcomings following World War I, Vietnam, and Iraq.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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It’s hard to believe that the gorgeous creature on the cover of this book is 69 years old.

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Andrew Ross Sorkin’s Too Big to Fail left a clear impression that Sorkin has to a great extent merely repeated the words of some of the government and business titans who played major role

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Keep Your Wives Away from Them is a must-have addition to any feminist scholar of religion’s bookshelf.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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