Cultural Affairs

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“offer[s] a rare glimpse into the military establishment and how it treats people who are marginalized by the mainstream American public.”

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Although many consider that the modernist period of literature began just prior to the start of the 20th century and continued into the 1960s, and included many familiar names, it is the year 1922

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“They are unhinged, mentally ill, and represent a clear and present danger to the world.”

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Crossing the River Kabul is a memoir that reads almost like a diary. It is the real life account of Baryalai Popal, the son of one of Afghanistan’s premier families.

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The Instill and Inspire volume is a comprehensive presentation of works lovingly and intentionally brought together by an African American couple, for African American artists, on behalf o

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In recent times of rising Islamophobia, rampant misinformation about Islam, and political rhetoric against Muslims, books showcasing the positive aspects of Muslims in America are very welcome.

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Happy Anyway is a collection of short essays by current and past denizens of Flint, Michigan—the hometown of General Motors.

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Booth writes with humor and intelligence while exploring serious ideas in this charming narrative.”

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Making art a part of your daily life is invigorating because it becomes a touchstone for one’s sensibilities.

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The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought is a gripping memoir that blends personal experience with history and complex empirical research.

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Ametora is defined as the Japanese slang abbreviation of “American Traditional.”

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Minh-ha Pham has taken a somewhat innocuous topic and tried to make it a Major Topic.

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Riad Sattouf, the cartoonist and social commentator, has drawn a colorful and engaging first chapter of his three-part autobiography—now in English.

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With every passing year, the media sends forth a new wave of apocalyptic predictions.

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“This book may not change hearts or minds, but it will provoke thought and discussion—and that is a contribution.”

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On May 12, 2015, two big events occurred in the digital universe.

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When the state of Indiana recently passed the Orwellian-sounding Religious Freedom Restoration Act in 2015, little did the lawmakers and Governor Mike Pence expect a swift blowback.

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By exploring these myths, Kenan Malik provides an important primer to revaluate the key drivers in current responses to ISIS, Boko Haram, and violent extremists in North A

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This is a book that can be read as an amazing story of high altitude climbing, skiing, ballooning, and biathlon: and as a commentary on the Great Questions of Our Time, relative to gender stereotyp

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“We can't fix America's meth problem without fixing America.”

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Haroon K. Ullah’s work focuses on democratization, security studies, and political party dynamics.

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In the 21st century we face a digital world where almost every aspect of our lives is recorded.

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“. . . a richly researched, carefully crafted, balanced history of personal privacy . . .”

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