Literary Nonfiction

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Andrew Dickson is former arts editor at the Guardian, was at the 2012 Shakespeare festival at the Globe Theater in London highlighted by productions of Shakespeare from all over the world

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Seiji Ozawa was a gifted piano student studying at Toho Gakuen School of Music in Japan, but after he hurt his hand playing rugby, he switched to conducting and received a scholarship to study unde

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As someone who teaches humanities courses at the university level, I am often in despair at the superficiality of understanding my students have regarding Shakespeare. 

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In May 1944, at the age of 77, Laura Ingalls Wilder received a letter from a schoolteacher in Cleveland, Ohio.

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She can write like no one else.”

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his writing can be luxuriated in.

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“It helps for readers to have a taste for the quirky, the offbeat, and the unusual.”

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The oevre of Charles Bukowski, American cult poet of the latter half of the 20th century, is something akin to an Antarctic ice sheet that mysteriously keeps growing while you would expect it to me

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has all of the makings and quality to become a collector’s item . . .”

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Mesmerizing and at times mesmerizingly confusing, Harold Bloom’s new opus, The Daemon Knows: Literary Greatness and the American Sublime, is (but only fractionally) this: A mix of the tend

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Jacob Dinezon (1856–1919) was a Yiddish novelist and short story writer, as famous during his lifetime as were his contemporaries, the three pillars of late 19th and early 20th century Yiddish lite

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“Bravo! May there be more of this kind of book!”

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“Dinezon’s writing is touching and evocative; his characters are vivid and memorable. . . .

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“Consider the brilliance of this dynamic that Mead has brought to bear on the novel, on her own life, and on literature!

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“Open the metaphorical doors and windows to this fine collection; let the textures and textures that are so generously infused into these poems find a place in your imagination.”

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“Pinsky’s conclusion of the Morgan case is endorsed by a good number of her surviving family members; but there are law enforcement officers who . . .  vehemently disagree.

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The Traveling Queen is a wildly rich and passionately far-reaching collection of poems . . .”

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“This haunting and beautiful collaboration . . . allows the reader to unfold discoveries and reclaim a sense of wonder.”

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In the introduction Robert Gottlieb notes The Most of Nora Ephron started out as a collaboration between him and Ms. Ephron that, sadly, she never saw completed. Following her death Mr.

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Born in Essex, England in 1923, and having lived for brief periods in Holland, France, Italy, Mexico, and most of her adult life in the United States, Denise Levertov viewed herself as “a trans-Atl

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Theo Pauline Nestor (How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed) is an author, blogger, and writing instructor whose latest book reads like a journey outlining one writer’s struggle for her own

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“. . . an excellent anthology of witty prose, astute analysis, and frenzied rage.”

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“. . . one gorgeous book . . . like attending a museum exhibition in the comfort of one’s own home.”

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