Jane Haile

Currently she is based in Brussels as an independent consultant working on gender, social development, and human rights for the U.N., the E.U., bilateral donors, and several universities in Europe and the States. She has written and published extensively in her field.

Book Reviews by Jane Haile

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Perry’s skewering of evolutionary rationales to explain and justify gender inequalities should keep us going for a while.”

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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This book presents itself as the “coming out” of Bennett and her Feminist Fight Club, a girl gang that banded together in 2009 to develop strategies for dealing with “sneaky micro-aggressions and o

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“Overall the book achieves its aim most efficiently and pleasurably, serving as an introduction to the academic world of Queer Theory . . .”

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This is an important book on an important subject, but not for the faint-hearted in its very detailed treatment of the ebb and flow of citizenship recognition and rights for LGBT individuals in Ame

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“an entirely convincing portrait of an entirely unconventional and brilliant individual.”

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In Sex Object: A Memoir Jessica Valenti, a feminist writer and commentator, chronicles her teenage and young adult years of sexual harassment on the streets and in the subways of New York.

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Few right-thinking people would question Maya Angelou’s status as an author, historian, intellectual, poet, social commentator, activist, and genuine Renaissance person.

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Labor of Love: the Invention of Dating is the witty title of Moira Weigel’s entertaining history of “dating” in the U.S.

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“MariNaomi does not disappoint her many fans.”

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Andi Zeisler, cofounder and creative director of the non-profit organization Bitch Media, sets out her stall in her introduction, reminding us that the point of the magazine Bitch was “to

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Described as a novel, this formidable example of that increasingly popular genre—biographical fiction—tells the life of the brilliant and celebrated 19th century English novelist George Eliot (1819

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The subtitle of Brooke Hauser’s new biography of Helen Gurley Brown—The Invention of Helen Gurley Brown and the Rise of the Modern Single Woman—is well chosen.

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The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye “presented by” Sonny Liew is a collector’s item—like a good wine or a piece of fine, old furniture—in its beautiful and artfully aged presentation; and al

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Described as a “fictional recreation” The Dig tells the story of the excavation of the famed Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk, the findings of which now have pride of place and a permanen

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This slipcased two-volume edition contains the unique issue of It Aint Me Babe (1970) and 17 issues of Wimmen’s Comix produced between 1972 and 1992—all of which are now out of pr

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The well-known author and biographer, Claire Harman, has given us what could be the definitive biography on Charlotte Brontë (1816–1855).

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This book addresses the issue of societal transformation “from male to female dominance” drawing on a range of statistical sources, publications, and anecdotal experiences, plus eight stories “from

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Curvology purports to take us on “a scientific journey into the evolution of women’s bodies and what that means for their brains.” Engagingly, David Bainbridge attempts to diffuse the unea

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This happy little stocking-filler is based on Sarah Galvin’s writing a column called "Wedding Crasher" for The Stranger newspaper in Seattle.

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“a highly readable book which is much more than casual journalism . . .”

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The basic thesis of this book, which modestly sets out to present a “science in the making,” is that “scarcity is not just a physical constraint.

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This is an engaging idea for a book engagingly written.

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If you are an appreciative reader of Adam Kirschs’ articles and reviews in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, and elsewhere you

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This is a book that can be read as an amazing story of high altitude climbing, skiing, ballooning, and biathlon: and as a commentary on the Great Questions of Our Time, relative to gender stereotyp

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“. . . no doubt it will please the loyal fan market to which it is directed.”  

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In The Big Lie: Motherhood, Feminism and the Reality of the Biological Clock Tanya Selvaratnam presents her own story of “heartbreak and self-discovery” relative to her attempts to become

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In the introduction to her book The XX Factor: How the Rise of Working Women Has Created a Far Less Equal World Alison Wolf states that “until now all women’s lives, whether rich or poor,

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“. . . exciting, provocative, and even dangerous . . .”

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“. . . thoroughly researched, cogently argued, and elegantly expressed . . .”

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A new publication by Jung Chang the author of the bestselling Wild Swans is always going to be an event, and the Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China seem

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Kat George’s Pink Bits is an example of the growing volume of media products—books, blogs, films, television shows—produced by young women primarily for a specific demographic of girls and

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This entertaining and well-structured book is an ethnography of the New Domesticity movement which the author sees as sweeping America.