Psychology

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“What might this be?” Such an innocuous question—such profound results. No psychological concept has penetrated culture as much as “the Inkblot test” has.

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As early as Hippocrates (c. 460 BCE–c. 370 CE), flummox and fascination have propelled the quest to understand the relationship between mind and body.

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Many readers might assume that a book with the title The Voices Within would be a text about auditory hallucinations, which are almost always seen as negative symptoms of a mental illness.

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There are times when a psychotherapist makes a huge difference in a client’s life and there are times when, despite best efforts, lives are lost.

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if you are looking for a book that describes the brain’s role in how we create perspective(s) and interact in the world, including some aspects of mental health and mental

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More than 47,000 Americans died of accidental overdose in 2014. What is causing this epidemic of overdose deaths?

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One wishes Play Anything by Ian Bogost would have been more enjoyable a read.

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At times, the most difficult but important books to read are the ones that hold a mirror to our lives and parenting behaviors. Glow Kids by Nicholas Karadaras is just such a book.

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“The prose is refined, even beautiful, which is unexpected when such a difficult subject is being discussed.”

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“even the most horrifying and bizarre beliefs are not sign and symptom of an irreparably broken mind.”

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At times, a scholarly well-written book will disappoint because it is not what the reader expects. Ordinarily Well by Dr. Peter Kramer falls into this category.

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Sex, lies, deceit, an outwardly moral woman who perpetrates shocking violence, and a gripping courtroom drama to bring her to justice—this sounds like the latest crime fiction novel, but in fact is

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In a world obsessed with productivity, it is timely to read a book that tells us who is likely to be productive and why. 

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Anthologies by authors that reproduce previous writings do not always make the best reading and can appear unconnected, dated, and stale.

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The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought is a gripping memoir that blends personal experience with history and complex empirical research.

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Sports writers, at least the really good ones, have always seemed to be philosophers driven to make a living or pay back their college education loans.

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If you are going to read one book on parenting this year, make it The Collapse of Parenting by Leonard Sax.

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Tales from the Couch is an interesting book and will likely appeal to non-professional readers.

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“Whether you are a believer, an agnostic, or an atheist, this book is about you.”

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Sheila Hamilton and her daughter Sophie suffered unimaginably and yet found their way to wholeness again. Both were entirely upended by the behavior and suicide of their husband and father, David.

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an illuminating linguistic, cartographic, and historical exploration of Parisian lusts.”

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“We neglect our bodies because we underestimate their intelligence . . .”

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Jane McGonigal has been acclaimed for decades for her theories in gaming and the value of games in relation to positive psychology and problem solving; however, it wasn’t until 2009, when she suffe

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“Sometimes it feels like Big Brother is watching—even when he’s not.”

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