U.S.

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“a solid introductory volume to anyone wishing to learn about America’s airborne forces in World War II . . .”

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“disturbing, revealing, and vitally important.”

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In case the nonstop celebration commemorating the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ Sgt.

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The history of the United States is still full of topics yet to be researched, explored, and revealed in book or other form.

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Environmental historian Miles Powell has provided a new and provocative angle to the history of the American conservation/preservation movement through the lens of its racial logics.

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It is always gratifying to learn history you don’t know.

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A Mind to Stay is a revealing history of much of the otherwise lost reality of thousands of plantations that lack documentation.”

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Jules Dassin’s classic film noir of New York, The Naked City, was released in 1948.

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We elect our leaders with a hope and a prayer. We generally do not know much about these men and women, except as they reveal themselves during a campaign.

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In this nonfiction work, the granddaughter of the late Abraham Zapruder relates the circumstances surrounding the filming of President Kennedy’s assassination on November 22, 1963, in Dallas, TX.

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Newspaper editor John O’Sullivan is generally credited with the development of, if not necessarily coining, the expression Manifest Destiny, the notion or idea that the United States of America sho

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John Avlon calls George Washington’s Farewell Address “the most famous American speech you’ve never read.” His new book, Washington’s Farewell, explores the history, intellectual formation

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Susan Quinn’s new book addresses a facet of Eleanor Roosevelt’s life that has been hinted at but never fully developed.

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“Al Capone was a son, husband, and father who was looking for the best way to become a good provider for everyone.”

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This is not one Till tale but three. When young Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi, in 1955, his death changed the Civil Rights Movement and American history.

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“a timely and thorough story without hyperbole or histrionics of this controversial chapter in American history. . .”

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For those who enjoy reading a well-told tale of historical nonfiction, this could be that story. But be forewarned that it comes with at least two caveats to be explained below.

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“Hovitz had the grit, determination and resources to pull herself out of the morass of PTSD. What about the rest of her generation growing up in this post-September 11 world?”

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The Pan-American Exposition opened in Buffalo in May 1901, the latest in a long line of world fairs.

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Local history can be rich, exotic, complicated, personal, and dark but especially when an incident like the Scopes Monkey Trial serves as an “island” in regional and national social currents.

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In the opening pages of March: Book Three, the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama has just ended its Sunday school lessons when a bomb explodes.

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The media has a hard time, even in documentaries, of presenting factually accurate history and especially so with movies.

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In recent times of rising Islamophobia, rampant misinformation about Islam, and political rhetoric against Muslims, books showcasing the positive aspects of Muslims in America are very welcome.

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Among historians certainly, it has been axiomatic that control of the authority and power of the Federal government was maintained by the so-called Southern plantation aristocracy for the first 75

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