Nonfiction

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Few right-thinking people would question Maya Angelou’s status as an author, historian, intellectual, poet, social commentator, activist, and genuine Renaissance person.

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“Beyond New York, the High Line has gone viral. From Seoul to Mexico City, cities worldwide have rushed to turn obsolete infrastructure into public space.”

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Neil Leifer discovered "a camera could be my ticket to everywhere. A kind of magic carpet . . . to anyplace I wanted to go." That camera took him to fascinating places.

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When the average American thinks of prison, she will often draw a blank. Sure, prisons are bad places filled with lawbreakers and violence, but specifics are often few and far between.

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I need a replacement word for fierce. I need something slightly less bloodying than savage and something more devastating than captious.

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Almanac is an inviting, almost cozy word. For example, The Old Farmer’s Almanac evokes a folksy image of sitting by the fireside planning spring planting.

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“The author is a wonderful writer. . . . extraordinarily skilled at explaining complex scientific ideas to the general reader.”

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Labor of Love: the Invention of Dating is the witty title of Moira Weigel’s entertaining history of “dating” in the U.S.

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Writing an all-encompassing book about the life of Paul McCartney is akin to writing the definitive biography of Jesus Christ.

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“a fast read about a ghastly situation and its effects on myriad people.”

The Red Parts by Maggie Nelson is a republication of her original work from 2007.

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Writing about sports, in particular about the historical pathways of baseball, is a favorite pastime of academics.

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Russia, to paraphrase Winston Churchill, is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. The key to understanding Russia, however, lies in her history.

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“MariNaomi does not disappoint her many fans.”

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Despite its rather bombastic title Peter Bergen has crafted an intelligent, timely, and important look into the post-9/11 challenge of Bin-Laden inspired terrorism in the United States.

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Stories about history are listed in the nonfiction category, but the classification is misleading. Historical facts are not neutral truths awaiting discovery and exposition.

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Donald Trump must be punching himself for not locking up the rights to the title of Parag Khanna’s second book in the trilogy that Connectography now completes.

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Adam Hochschild’s book, Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939 gives us a different take on reporting about wars and their effect.

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Revealing the true personality of a portrait sitter has always been the challenge for photographers since the early daguerreotypes or for painters over the past 3,000 years.

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Cartels are businesses that exist on the wildly entrepreneurial illegal side of capitalism.

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“a single overarching volume on World War II espionage and covert action that has long been missing . . .”

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Introducing Quiet Power, Susan Cain writes to her kids and team audience, “Through the stories and experiences of other young people like you, I’ll address questions that introverts often

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