Nonfiction

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“The history of America's most elite fighting force is told with panache and critical analysis . . .”

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The early history of submarines is replete with examples of disasters, not terribly surprising given the limitations and newness of the technology.

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In his debut collection of poems, acclaimed prose writer Colin Channer has set out to build multiple levels in the construct of a story—life as seen through layers of gauze, probing the complex fam

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“Sometimes it feels like Big Brother is watching—even when he’s not.”

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“Each of these moving poems is a metaphor of mutuality and mutability, of vulnerability and union.”

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“more educational and enlightening than it is entertaining.”

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We should be grateful that the sunflower has no sweet fragrance.

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“It helps for readers to have a taste for the quirky, the offbeat, and the unusual.”

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Abraham Lincoln is one of the most haunting presidents in US history. Sightings of his ghost, and his assassin’s, have been reported for more than 150 years.

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Meera Subramanian, in her book A River Runs Again, poses the problem of the state of India’s ecology and its decline since the 1950s and the Green Revolution.

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“written accessibly and intelligently, without hyperbole . . . a sincere work of scholarship . . .”

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Author of Single Digits Marc Chamberland provides his take on the significance of the single digits excluding zero (zero’s significance is so great it can fill a book all by itself).

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"a fascinating book that draws many parallels with Western medicine . . ."

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The oevre of Charles Bukowski, American cult poet of the latter half of the 20th century, is something akin to an Antarctic ice sheet that mysteriously keeps growing while you would expect it to me

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Modern day society is familiar with the existence, accomplishments, and exploits of America’s Special Operations forces, in particular the warriors known as U.S. Navy SEALs.

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A book with an intriguing title and potentially interesting content sometimes disappoints.

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Something decidedly odd is going on at Blood Moon Productions, whose Babylon Series has recently released its latest Hollywood biography: Peter O’Toole: Hellraiser, Sexual Outlaw, Irish Rebel

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Veteran sportswriter Lonnie Wheeler’s latest baseball book, Intangiball: The Subtle Things That Win Baseball Games, is somewhat akin to trying to prove the existence of Big Foot.

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Evaluating talent in any line of work is a difficult challenge.

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“May we find the courage . . . to make this land . . . a more just, more reasonable, and more tolerant place.”

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“. . . conceptualizes the issues of our time and may well be seminal in our understanding of today’s youth.”

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“It is a memoir full of ache. An ache siblings understand.”

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If that "Stay thirsty my friends" Dos Equis man hadn't been dubbed "The Most Interesting Man in the World," surely Geoffrey Kent could claim the sobriquet.

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Think of any team in the comic universe and they undoubtedly owe a debt of gratitude and inspiration to The Justice Society of America.

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