Nonfiction

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Graeme Wood traces the origins of this work and his pursuit of greater understanding of the Islamic State to having almost been killed by a suicide bomber in Mosul in 2004.

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“Salustri’s guide offers a delightful trip around and through this curious state.”

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“a highly engaging, charming read . . .”

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At the University of Pennsylvania, where I teach memoir, I’ve started a tradition.

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Books in the Mediterranean cooking genre are a dime a dozen. The Mediterranean is a big place. In it are numerous cuisines of many different derivations.

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“Yes, I believe [Steven] Avery is innocent. This is my opinion, which I know is not worth very much, but my opinion is based on an assessment of the evidence.”
—Jerome F. Buting

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“What might this be?” Such an innocuous question—such profound results. No psychological concept has penetrated culture as much as “the Inkblot test” has.

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It is entirely possible that the vast majority of Americans have never thought of or even considered the possibility that their country and its white supremacist legislation of the 1930s would ever

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Residents in the newly formed United States of America may have witnessed its first national public relations campaign when Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay argued for a national con

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Chelo Manchego tackles a poignant and universal issue in his book The Want Monsters.

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Pulitzer Prize-winning former Washington Post reporter and journalism professor Glenn Frankel has found a new calling as an incisive interpreter of classic Western films.

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It is always gratifying to learn history you don’t know.

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A Mind to Stay is a revealing history of much of the otherwise lost reality of thousands of plantations that lack documentation.”

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“this book shows, for the men serving on the front lines next to the Iron Curtain, conflict was always a real possibility that could happen at any time.”

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Brad Snyder’s new book The House of Truth is part intellectual history and part biography.

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Why are we so fascinated by photographs of pristine places? Escapism via armchair travel? Hunger to return to simpler times and less-trodden lands where nature still holds sway?

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“a delight as well as a revelation.”

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Any intelligent person knows that most Muslims are peaceful people, and that they’d tell you Islam is a religion of peace.

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This is the kind of fashion tome that has a distinction all its own within the genre of fashion books.

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“As one of the most highly decorated units in Army history, these men are worthy successors to Band of Brothers . . .”

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Jules Dassin’s classic film noir of New York, The Naked City, was released in 1948.

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We elect our leaders with a hope and a prayer. We generally do not know much about these men and women, except as they reveal themselves during a campaign.

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The subtitle of this book is How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution, so you might think that Donald Trump plays the starring role in it. But you’d be wrong. He doesn’t.

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provides essential inspiration, information, resources, and insights.”

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“seeks to overturn long held canon among military historians about the conduct and role of battles in warfare . . .”

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