Nonfiction

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Parent Hacks by Asha Dornfest is a clever assortment of time saving shortcuts and creative tricks designed to help parents.

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The Most Wanted Man in China is Fang Lizhi’s memoir, written in 1989 but not published until now, four years after his death.

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Lust and Wonder, Augusten Burroughs’ latest memoir (Where does he get all the life experiences to fill so very many memoirs?) begins with a bit of a ba-boom.

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Plato asserted that “What is honored in a country will be cultivated there.” If so,  it could be argued that the U.S.A. today honors computers, social media, and the iPhone.

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It is this kind of insight . . . that makes [Traister’s] important work a significant addition to the literature of sociology and women’s studies.”

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It has been said before and bears repeating, but it is always gratifying when the stories of more obscure incidents and events of a historical period are published for the information and edificati

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The most pertinent fact about Sarah Moon: Now and Then is that this is not some glossy table coffee table book but rather a very scholarly, if not erudite, examination of Sarah Moon’s body

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“This is a volume rich with the wisdom of one of our finest poets, a book laced with darkness and saturated with light.”

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Long before Etan Patz disappeared on his way to school in SoHo, and long before parents suspected the worst might happen to their children at any moment, an 11-year-old boy was kidnapped and murder

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“one line in the book . . . perhaps sums up the vast journey . . . 'a gun gives that ultimate edge of authority to someone who lacks it through intelligence alone.'”

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Make Your Mark is an extraordinary collection of work that will leave a lasting impression.”

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In Paws of Courage: True Tales of Heroic Dogs That Protect and Serve by Nancy Furstinger, readers get a bird’s-eye—make that dog’s-eye—view of the fast-paced lives of military dog

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In line with the latest of gorgeous cookbooks under #foodporn and #travelporn, Jose Pizarro’s Basque is more than a collection of regional recipes.

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The subtitle of Brooke Hauser’s new biography of Helen Gurley Brown—The Invention of Helen Gurley Brown and the Rise of the Modern Single Woman—is well chosen.

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American “exceptionalism” has once again become a political headline. Few candidates would dare to challenge the underlying truth that America is simply better than all other nations.

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If one picture is worth a thousand words then Night Flowers would be five complete sets of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

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If there were a genre classification “nonfiction thriller” then this riveting book would be its bestselling headliner.

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“. . . the author unravels the secrets of how plants grow in her quest to understand the fundamentals of botany and transform herself into a better gardener in the process.”

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Megan Grumbling won the 2015 Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry for her book about Bernard A. Booker, the unofficial mayor of Ell Pond in rural Maine.

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“bakers of all ages will enjoy this 72-page dessert extravaganza . . .”

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“The fast-paced prose is just as much fun as the illustrations and manages to shine the light on the Great Blondin’s humor as well as his singleness of purpose.”

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In 1930, 18-year-old Betty Thorpe married British diplomat Arthur Pack and left Washington, DC, for Chile where Pack was commissioned.

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“Bonnie Cashin is a law unto herself,” said Bernadine Morris, fashion critic of the New York Times.

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The tale and toll of man’s inhumanity to man is a long, complex, and tragic one, especially when it comes to bondage, slavery, involuntary servitude—call it what you like.

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The War on Alcohol retells the story of Prohibition with a cocktail of case studies, legal analysis, and a broad scope.”

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