Nonfiction

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The Manhattan Project, the so-called American mission to develop an atomic weapon in World War II, was rightly accorded the highest secrecy of any operation of the Federal government, notwithstandi

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Dick Allen, former poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of eight books of poetry in a wide range of forms, gives us a quietly stunning collection of poems here in a tradition of American Zen

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Meredith Tax is to be commended for her thorough and well-documented book about the history and politics of a region of the world most people know very little about.

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One need not be an equestrian or horse lover in order to appreciate this story.

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“America is a rampage nation, where mass shootings now pose the greatest credible threat to public safety, surpassing even terrorism.”

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The author might have led the reader to think of New York City as chock full of sedition during the Civil War. It may have had more than its share.

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Mary Roach is a fairly prolific author who brings humor and common sense to popular science.

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“While the reader can feel compassion for Ms. Janowitz . . . he would not wish in a million years to . . . ever again read another volume of her memoirs.”

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“a workman-like job of revising many of the myths and misconceptions about the battle . . .”

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Though author James Salter died in 2015, a few months before he died he was the writer in residence at the University of Virginia and wrote and gave three lectures.

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“Burton and O’Reilly have an important book to write, but this was not it.”

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At times, the most difficult but important books to read are the ones that hold a mirror to our lives and parenting behaviors. Glow Kids by Nicholas Karadaras is just such a book.

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“For some families, sending a child to a private university now is like buying a BMW every year—and driving it off a cliff.

How God Became God is an excellent tool for furthering spiritual development.”

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“[a] charming, inspiring book.”

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“As stories of wrongful convictions go, Adnan’s Story is hands-down a certain winner.”

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It’s never too early to begin teaching children about the way America’s voting system works, and this is the premise of author Bonnie Worth’s new rhyming picture book, One Vote, Two Votes, I Vo

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As author Leon Wildes himself admits, this book has been a long time coming. John Lennon fought his immigration battle against “the USA” back in the early 1970s.

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Since its 2015 publication, Ari Berman’s Give Us the Ballot has received near universal acclaim, including Notable or Best Book of the Year status from The New York Times, The

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In Our Own Image will make accessible to readers many of the complex issues behind artificial intelligence (AI).

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Who Shot Sports is an engrossing photo exhibition between covers that more than proves the truism that a picture is, indeed, worth a thousand words.

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". . . brings to life the many characters and truly bizarre and astonishing events."

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From the 1960s through the early ‘90s, Italy was host to an artistic subgenre known as “sexy fumetti,” a wild blend of eroticism, horror, violence, and some extremely messed-up humor.

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Renowned sportswriter David Goldblatt’s encyclopedic history of the Olympic Games is a timely and impressively expansive view of arguably the world’s most beloved sporting event, as he chronicles t

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