Political & Social Science

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"This is a book for everyone who has ever questioned the validity of the “war on drugs,” the “war on poverty,” or any other governmental attempt to solve social ills . . ."

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Brian Donovan’s newest study, Respectability on Trial: Sex Crimes in New York City, 1900–1918, is an invaluable addition to the ever-growing library of scholarly works on the history of Go

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There have always been fierce rivalries between countries to protect their people and their goods. Enmity has often engendered conflict.

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“A must-read for any educator or anyone interested in better understanding the transcendental power of higher education.”

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“this book is an excellent introduction to the complex issues of East Asia and the potential for conflict in this critical region of the world . . .”

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“a refreshing look at the causes of mass incarceration . . . a must-read for anyone involved in the criminal justice reform movement.”

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The body of scholarship dedicated to analyzing, understanding, and changing America's enormous carceral complex is growing fast.

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“College for prisoners saves money and provides great net benefits to the prisoner and the community.”

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Graeme Wood traces the origins of this work and his pursuit of greater understanding of the Islamic State to having almost been killed by a suicide bomber in Mosul in 2004.

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Residents in the newly formed United States of America may have witnessed its first national public relations campaign when Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay argued for a national con

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Brad Snyder’s new book The House of Truth is part intellectual history and part biography.

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Any intelligent person knows that most Muslims are peaceful people, and that they’d tell you Islam is a religion of peace.

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provides essential inspiration, information, resources, and insights.”

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Human civilization is constantly changing, argues David Smick in The Great Equalizer: How Main Street Capitalism Can Create an Economy for Everyone, a manifesto for a new set of policies d

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If every journalist wrote like Patrick Kingsley, more people would likely be reading the critical nonfiction books of our time.

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As a somewhat jaded and world-weary incarcerated writer, rarely do I read something that makes me really mad.

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Fuller’s explanation of the effect of Darwin’s theory certainly will stand as a fascinating example of the impact of scientific work on popular theory.”

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“The criminal justice system has adapted itself to the world of mass incarceration.”

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Perry’s skewering of evolutionary rationales to explain and justify gender inequalities should keep us going for a while.”

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Written/Unwritten is a collection of essays by American academic faculty of color who have written poignant essays about the challenges, barriers, pain, and resilience required of being a

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The Death and Life of the Single Family House is an important contribution to urban studies . . .”

 

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This book presents itself as the “coming out” of Bennett and her Feminist Fight Club, a girl gang that banded together in 2009 to develop strategies for dealing with “sneaky micro-aggressions and o

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In 1852 Charles Dickens said of solitary confinement, "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain, to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body: and because its g

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