Political & Social Science

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A reasonable argument can be made that some of the unrest in Ferguson, Cleveland, New York City, and Baltimore in response to the deaths of young black men at the hands of law enforcement, nurtured

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James Forman Jr.’s new book tells an all-too-hidden and tragic part of the story of the rise of the racist mass incarceration state in the United States.

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In a recent interview, Professor Allan Lichtman—who has successfully predicted the outcome of presidential elections since 1982—said America’s founding fathers “believed that impeachment was a crit

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One of the pleasant interludes in the Cold War was the ecstatic reception that Van Cliburn received at Moscow’s first-ever Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in 1958.

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What are the forces at play behind the referendum for Brexit, the election of Donald Trump, the rise of political extremism and polarization, and the outbursts of violence we see in the world today

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“patients can save thousands of dollars by purchasing An American Sickness by Elizabeth Rosenthal.”

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At age 23, Drew Philp, a rural, white kid from Michigan moved to bankrupt Detroit, a place filled with blighted abandoned houses and crime.

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Almost 20 years ago, David Brooks laid out the one reason journalists should pay attention to Princeton students. The kids at Princeton today are the leaders of most places tomorrow.

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In his 1964 classic, Suicide of the West, James Burnham expressed the global geopolitical contraction of the West by showing the unmistakable trend of the Western powers’ loss of control o

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offers real solutions to the problems immigration poses and gives us facts to combat false narratives and hateful political discourse.”

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“a wake up call about the dangers of entrenching divisions around national identity—a summons to action.”

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“provides a broad and comprehensive framework from which anyone can gain an understanding of the powerful forces that drive the criminal justice system.”

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"This is a book for everyone who has ever questioned the validity of the “war on drugs,” the “war on poverty,” or any other governmental attempt to solve social ills . . ."

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There have always been fierce rivalries between countries to protect their people and their goods. Enmity has often engendered conflict.

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Brian Donovan’s newest study, Respectability on Trial: Sex Crimes in New York City, 1900–1918, is an invaluable addition to the ever-growing library of scholarly works on the history of Go

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“A must-read for any educator or anyone interested in better understanding the transcendental power of higher education.”

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“this book is an excellent introduction to the complex issues of East Asia and the potential for conflict in this critical region of the world . . .”

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The body of scholarship dedicated to analyzing, understanding, and changing America's enormous carceral complex is growing fast.

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“a refreshing look at the causes of mass incarceration . . . a must-read for anyone involved in the criminal justice reform movement.”

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“College for prisoners saves money and provides great net benefits to the prisoner and the community.”

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Graeme Wood traces the origins of this work and his pursuit of greater understanding of the Islamic State to having almost been killed by a suicide bomber in Mosul in 2004.

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Residents in the newly formed United States of America may have witnessed its first national public relations campaign when Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay argued for a national con

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Brad Snyder’s new book The House of Truth is part intellectual history and part biography.

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