Richard Rivera

Richard Rivera is a fine arts photographer, artist, designer, and writer who worked in publishing, advertising, film, and illustration. His illustrations have graced the covers of paperback books and magazines, and his projects include co-producing and writing the award-winning television series TalkFiction (Time-Warner Cable), working as a still-photographer on independent films, and re-designing and art directing the contemporary music magazine, New Music Connoisseur. His forthcoming Eagles of New York™ is a photographic celebration of the eagle in the architecture and sculpture of New York City, the first of a planned series of large-scale art projects in major cities around the world. A native New Yorker, he is a graduate from the School of Visual Arts. His photographs are in the permanent collection of the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

Book Reviews by Richard Rivera

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“His skaters are akin to acrobats poised in midair, neither ascending nor falling, but perfectly pictured in a world of their own.”

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Fred Herzog’s images in Modern Color were created over 50 years ago and still have the power to stop you in your tracks.

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“a practical reference to achieving great results while bypassing post-processing.”

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“a fascinating, stirring, and well-researched tale with insights into the thinking and lives of flawed people.”

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a superb addition to those desiring to master the conversion of color images to black and white.”

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It is a notable achievement when photography is used in healing a family.”

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Henry Wessel documents life in the 20th century with a well-established black and white photographic style.

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“echoes with a vision of the otherworldly, and a kind of purity where gravity has no pull and people float in a world of color and abstract beauty.”

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Manuello Paganelli’s Cuba: A Personal Journey, 1989–2016, begins with his story of lost family connections and trying to rediscover his Cuban roots.

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“an extraordinary examination of parallel paths of two phenomenal artists, their work, and their seminal effect, which extends to the present day.”

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Gordon Parks: I Am You: Selected Works 1942–1978 is an astounding book displaying the remarkable photographic talents of Gordon Parks, a man who was equally at ease in documenting the Civi

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“Those who are fans of Trager's work, especially his silvery black and white images, will find Ina’s portraits a rewarding pleasure.”

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Philip Trager’s photographic record of New York in the 1970s is his depiction of a city marked by solitude.

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50 Contemporary Photographers You Should Know is meant to be a Who’s Who of current influential photographers with the assumption that anyone who cares about contemporary photogra

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Edward Burtynsky’s aerial photographs in Essential Elements go beyond the kind of satellite images and views that Google Earth has made commonplace in recent years.

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“an extraordinary achievement that allows us a greater understanding of the history of mental illness.”

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Benjamin Grant has created a unique series of images in Overview: A New Perspective of Earth, which illustrates that “there needs to be a dramatic shift in the way our species views our pl

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“the book succeeds as a primer for new photographers and inspiration for experienced lovers of photography.”

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an engaging compendium, a fascinating read, and a valuable resource . . .”

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Franck Bohbot’s color photography in Light on New York City captures the iconic and not so-iconic places in New York City at night.

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The opening pages of Anderson & Low on the Set of James Bond’s Spectre strike the reader with the sheer beauty of images of vast interior spaces.

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For those of us who love the exuberance of Robin Williams’ stand-up comedy and enjoy his movies and the way they make us laugh (The Birdcage), or consider the absurdity of war (Good Mo

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“a treasure trove of insight on the artist . . .”

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World Press Photo 16 is a collection of the most powerful and poignant images from photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world that have garnered attention and pra

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To most of us, Stuart Davis’ paintings are a joyful expression of color and frolicking graphic forms that seem to explode on the canvas in unscripted rhythms.

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“a remarkably insightful book—a wonderful, small format gem bursting with illuminating concepts and images.”

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Revealing the true personality of a portrait sitter has always been the challenge for photographers since the early daguerreotypes or for painters over the past 3,000 years.

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Artists aspiring to become great painters often learn much by studying the old masters, and similarly photographers desirous to learn portrait lighting techniques often turn to great images by mast

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Minor White was a poet, writer, educator, curator and photographer whose impact on photography was immeasurable.

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Making art a part of your daily life is invigorating because it becomes a touchstone for one’s sensibilities.

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Anna Mia Davidson’s Cuba Black and White sheds light on the quality of life of the average person in Cuba by showing us their casual activities in streets, barber shops, and gyms, as well

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“a fascinating source of material for those interested in visual anthropology and the impact of a developing urban art and social language.”

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The Visual Palette: Defining Your Photographic Style by Brian Matiash is a book aimed at photographers who are familiar with taking pictures but wish to have a greater knowledge in shaping

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India by Steve McCurry is a book of first impressions that are intense and heartfelt.

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Louis Stettner's Penn Station, New York is not a photo book about the grandeur or architecture of the original Pennsylvania station—which should have been declared a landmark but instead w

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Gerard Koeppel's City on a Grid: How New York Became New York is a fascinating and curious story that takes us back through time to the early beginnings of the city called Nieuw Amsterdam

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“The degree of media, materials, and forms presented is truly extraordinary.”

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In 1962 Joel Meyerowitz was a junior art director at a New York City advertising agency.

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Fine art photography is driven by concepts.

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“will be treasured by lovers of New York City for many years to come.”

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The World of Tim Burton is a delightful romp in a world of imagination that showcases Burton’s sketches, watercolors, and oil paintings and gives great insight into his spontaneous creativ

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One would think that with all the international settings, romantic affairs, wars, lovers, and change of circumstance that accost the main character of Sweet Caress it would be a dynamic, i

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Cindy Sherman is a unique artist whose photography distinguishes itself by her presence both in front of and behind the camera, as photographer and model, director and actor.

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will be a treasured volume for years to come.”

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Dennis Hopper's Drugstore Camera is a freewheeling abstract monologue, a visual stream of consciousness and free verse.

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has all of the makings and quality to become a collector’s item . . .”

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The New York based collective DIS, with its focus on art, pop culture, documentation, and exhibition, explores the roots and use of the selfie as an art form in their book DIS #artselfie.

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“Finlay is expert in her knowledge and delves beneath the superficial to reveal why colors captivate our imaginations.”

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“Mortensen’s imagery is rich with fantastical and grotesque elements reminiscent of Brueghel, Hieronymous Bosch, or Goya.”

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strikes a wonderful balance between an art gallery book and a how-to book for the more creative and adventuresome.”