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Two hundred years after her death on July 18, 1817, Jane Austen and her novels are now more beloved than ever before.

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Although many consider that the modernist period of literature began just prior to the start of the 20th century and continued into the 1960s, and included many familiar names, it is the year 1922

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Ever since it was first published in England in 1847 and in the U.S. in 1848, Jane Eyre has been a literary phenomenon, widely read, profoundly influential, and lovingly imitated.

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Sherman Alexie’s compelling memoir offers a mix of poetry and prose that links emotional intimacy to a powerful narrative that will likely keep readers off balance.

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Angela Jackson’s biography A Surprised Queenhood in the New Black Sun: The Life and Legacy of Gwendolyn Brooks comes on the eve of the 100th anniversary of Brooks’ birth.

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Every man of God has two religions, according to writer Patricia Lockwood: one belonging to heaven and the other to the world.

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“. . . introduces Millay as a fascinating personality. . . . an iconic American female (and feminist) poet . . . and the book enhances details of her life long overlooked.”

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"experience the wonder of Shapiro’s magical prose."

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“a worthwhile read. It will most certainly fascinate Dos Passos and Hemingway aficionados, as well as the casual literary biography enthusiast.”

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“an author who has carved out her own territory and made the personal essay into a thing of beauty.”

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Robert Lowell was at the forefront of post WWII American letters, his volumes of poetry The Mills of the Kavanaughs, Life Studies, and Lord Weary’s Castle among the most lauded po

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“a delight as well as a revelation.”

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In The Pen and the Brush, the versatile biographer Anka Muhlstein explores some of the complex and fascinating relationships that have existed between painters and novelists.

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Kahlil Gibran’s prose, visual art and advocacy for transcultural unity made him a citizen of the world during his lifetime, admired in the east and west.

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One of the titans of 20th century American literature, Ernest Hemingway was larger than life and an adventurer of the first rank. He was also imperfect, flawed and, therefore, human.

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“an extraordinary and thought provoking view on the playwright’s life and works.”

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Journalist Tom Di Nardo started his career as a freelance critic at the Philadelphia Bulletin as a side gig to his day job and was later a longtime contributor the Philadelphia Daily N

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“Emer O’Sullivan’s The Fall of the House of Wilde: Oscar Wilde and His Family seems the Oscar.

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Rachel Corbett is editor of Modern Painter magazine and her arts coverage appears in The New Yorker and The New York Times.

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All good writers who treasure their craft adhere to some technique guidelines that will help them produce their best writing. One of the first techniques they learn is observation.

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Here’s an irony: If ever a book title needed editing, it could be the one on the cover of award-winning American editor Terry McDonell’s new book.

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“While the reader can feel compassion for Ms. Janowitz . . . he would not wish in a million years to . . . ever again read another volume of her memoirs.”

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature calls Moby-Dick “the closest approach the U.S.

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