Authors

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“an author who has carved out her own territory and made the personal essay into a thing of beauty.”

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Robert Lowell was at the forefront of post WWII American letters, his volumes of poetry The Mills of the Kavanaughs, Life Studies, and Lord Weary’s Castle among the most lauded po

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“a delight as well as a revelation.”

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In The Pen and the Brush, the versatile biographer Anka Muhlstein explores some of the complex and fascinating relationships that have existed between painters and novelists.

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Kahlil Gibran’s prose, visual art and advocacy for transcultural unity made him a citizen of the world during his lifetime, admired in the east and west.

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One of the titans of 20th century American literature, Ernest Hemingway was larger than life and an adventurer of the first rank. He was also imperfect, flawed and, therefore, human.

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“an extraordinary and thought provoking view on the playwright’s life and works.”

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Journalist Tom Di Nardo started his career as a freelance critic at the Philadelphia Bulletin as a side gig to his day job and was later a longtime contributor the Philadelphia Daily N

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“Emer O’Sullivan’s The Fall of the House of Wilde: Oscar Wilde and His Family seems the Oscar.

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Rachel Corbett is editor of Modern Painter magazine and her arts coverage appears in The New Yorker and The New York Times.

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All good writers who treasure their craft adhere to some technique guidelines that will help them produce their best writing. One of the first techniques they learn is observation.

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Here’s an irony: If ever a book title needed editing, it could be the one on the cover of award-winning American editor Terry McDonell’s new book.

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“While the reader can feel compassion for Ms. Janowitz . . . he would not wish in a million years to . . . ever again read another volume of her memoirs.”

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature calls Moby-Dick “the closest approach the U.S.

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Few right-thinking people would question Maya Angelou’s status as an author, historian, intellectual, poet, social commentator, activist, and genuine Renaissance person.

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I need a replacement word for fierce. I need something slightly less bloodying than savage and something more devastating than captious.

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Lust and Wonder, Augusten Burroughs’ latest memoir (Where does he get all the life experiences to fill so very many memoirs?) begins with a bit of a ba-boom.

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“The Whole Harmonium is a must-read for anyone interested in knowing more about the man who wrote some of the most imaginative and brilliant poems in the American

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“Damn good book, Dimestore.”

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Many readers will pick up this book purely to discover more about the legendary “wild man of American journalism” Hunter S. Thompson, and they won’t be disappointed. Written by his son, Juan F.

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The well-known author and biographer, Claire Harman, has given us what could be the definitive biography on Charlotte Brontë (1816–1855).

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After the release of his quirky 2014 movie The Grand Budapest Hotel, director/writer Wes Anderson confessed to The Daily Telegraph in London, “I stole from Stefan Zweig,” though n

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He wrote The Caine Mutiny, Marjorie Morningstar, Youngblood Hawke, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. He won the Pulitzer, TV miniseries fame, and the girl of his dreams.

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