Historical

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Biographer James Thomas Flexner has called George Washington the “indispensable man” of the American Revolution.

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"Prevas intimately knows the battlefields, mountains, and rivers; he takes the reader on a sort of travelogue as well as telling a great immortal story."

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More often than not, when one thinks of the actions taken against the various categories of Europe’s “undesirables” in World War II, it is usually in terms of the Axis: Germany and, to a lesser ext

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"John Harte, a former playwright and freelance writer . . . has written a very uneven book about Churchill and the First World War."

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“Daring to Drive is a testament to how women in Muslim countries are helping change their culture, one step at a time.”

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The blood soaked epic rise of the Tudors from powerful family to self-made royalty is one of the great political dramas in history.

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In his 1943 classic, The Machiavellians, the political philosopher James Burnham praised Niccolo Machiavelli for writing truthfully and unsentimentally about the way political leaders gain

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There have been many instances where one wishes one could have been a fly on the wall in order to know what was said at the time or what really happened, particularly, say, in the commission of a c

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Andreas Kluth tells us that Plutarch, who lived from 46 CE to 120 CE, is widely acclaimed as the father of biography.

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". . . a passionately written j’accuse against the French collaborators . . ."

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“Javelin catcher, confidant, consigliere, battlefield commander.” These are some common roles undertaken by the White House Chief of Staff.

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Susan Quinn’s new book addresses a facet of Eleanor Roosevelt’s life that has been hinted at but never fully developed.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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Nobody’s Son is the culmination of a family’s gradual demise.

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William F. Buckley, Jr. led an extraordinary life.

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In the spring of 1861, scant months after the secession of the southern states and the commencement of the Civil War, the United States government was faced with a crisis of logistics.

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Drink it in with a cup of Earl Grey Tea on a cold winter evening.”

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“Christine Negroni uses her experience and broad knowledge of air disasters to summarize and integrate investigations.”

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“This is history, through the glass darkly, with all the attendant perils of the great darkness that was the Holocaust in Poland, both during and after the Second World War and in the decades of co

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And with every day that passes you become poorer within, the internal frost becomes sharper, the heart hardens. Yes, you are alive.

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Pioneer CIA director and espionage historian Allen Dulles famously wrote that more spy craft commonly went on in any Italian city state in the Renaissance than in the whole of the relatively modern

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There has been a revival of interest in the life and career of General Douglas MacArthur, perhaps because the United States has “pivoted” to the Asia-Pacific in its current foreign policy.

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature calls Moby-Dick “the closest approach the U.S.

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Russia, to paraphrase Winston Churchill, is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. The key to understanding Russia, however, lies in her history.

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