Fiction.

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“there is a good deal to get excited about in pondering the future work of Chanelle Benz.”

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Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson is the story of Mary Addison who allegedly murdered a baby girl when she was only nine years old.

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Georgia Hunter presumably loves her family and didn’t want to insult anyone when she set out to write a fictionalized account of how these well-to-do, assimilated Polish Jews survived the Holocaust

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Saunders sustains his great talent.”

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Heartbreak Hotel, the 32nd novel in the Alex Delaware series by Jonathan Kellerman, begins with an enticing hook.

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The Third Hell is one hell of a good story.”

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Emily Robbins has written a lyrical story about love in nearly all of its manifestations.

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What a strange, bizarre, wandering, surreal, hard-to-explain but easy-to-feel book Shadowbahn is.

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Superman: The Golden Age Omnibus, Volume 3 is the third installment in the Superman Omnibus series. It is comprised of Action Comics No. 48–65, Superman No.

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Healing is a theme that pervades Aharon Appelfeld’s prolific fiction (Blooms of Darkness; Until the Dawn’s Light; and Suddenly, Love; all reviewed on NYJB) and challenges his Shoa

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Imagine you’re a young mother whose two children have vanished. Imagine you’re divorced and sleeping around. Imagine you’re a waitress who likes provocative clothes and makeup.

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“The novel’s mercurial prose may take some readers out of the reading experience, but then, this style is a bit of an acquired taste.”

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"You're not safe out on your own right now," Bronko tells her. "None of us are."

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Black Feathers is a well-conceived and -executed anthology, and a showcase of some of the finest speculative and weird fiction of 2017.”

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Michael Tolkin is a great writer, and his grasp of satire is excellent. He is known for The Player and his scathing send ups of Hollywood culture.

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“a compelling story conveying a powerful social and cultural critique along with a marvelous portrait of the beauties and wonders of Kenya . . .”

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“a fascinating thriller that is at the same time a dark fairy tale. . .”

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“. . . . joyous and raunchy . . . Yoss creates a fascinating and beautiful universe built upon the ideals of cooperation and egalitarianism.”

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How to Catch the Easter Bunny  is a delightfully cute story about an Easter bunny named E. B. who is very hard to catch.

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“I am a refugee who, like many others, has never ceased being a refugee in some corner of my mind.”

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Enigma Variations, the new novel by Andre Aciman, who previously presented us with that peach of a tale, Call Me By Your Name, has been packaged strangely.

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Neil Connelly's sixth book, In the Wake of Our Vows, is a collection of short stories that deals primarily—in often unique and humorous ways—with relationships.

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The hero of this first-in-a-series novel by Rob McCarthy derives its title from a poem by T. S. Eliot.

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In Melanie Wallace’s third novel, her first in hardback by a major publisher, Olive Kitteridge meets Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina, both interpreted by Alice Munro.

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Who knew that a basic, everyday umbrella could be more than a simple shelter from the weather? The five imaginative, fun loving characters in The Green Umbrella certainly did.

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