Science & Math

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What a fun book the Intergalactic Travel Bureau has brought us!

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Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of our leading science writers who has a talent for making complicated ideas built of math and physics accessible to people who aren't experts in those fields.

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Environmental historian Miles Powell has provided a new and provocative angle to the history of the American conservation/preservation movement through the lens of its racial logics.

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“Why are futurists so often wrong, and why do we even listen to them given their poor track record?”

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Reckoning with Matter focuses on two inventors Blaise Pascal and Charles Babbage, and their efforts in the invention and construction of mechanical calculators.

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Fuller’s explanation of the effect of Darwin’s theory certainly will stand as a fascinating example of the impact of scientific work on popular theory.”

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“Is there any question more fascinating than whether or not we are alone in the universe?” asks author Ben Miller in The Aliens Are Coming!.

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The majority of humankind has long since stopped depending on hunting for subsistence, but we are still strangely fascinated by wild animals, the larger the better.

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if you are looking for a book that describes the brain’s role in how we create perspective(s) and interact in the world, including some aspects of mental health and mental

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Benjamin Grant has created a unique series of images in Overview: A New Perspective of Earth, which illustrates that “there needs to be a dramatic shift in the way our species views our pl

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More than 47,000 Americans died of accidental overdose in 2014. What is causing this epidemic of overdose deaths?

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When George Mallory was asked why he climbed Mount Everest he said, “Because it was there.” A similar kind of question was asked of Peter Diamandis, founder of the XPRIZE.

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Code Warriors is an informative, well balanced, and eye-opening history of the NSA.”

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Daniel Levitin wants us to eat our spinach, an unsavory chore for an increasingly innumerate society.

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If there were a genre classification “nonfiction thriller” then this riveting book would be its bestselling headliner.

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“Rublack creates an astute and informative study of witchcraft and witch trials.”

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The Shock of the Anthropocene is a detailed, data-driven, and well-argued critique of conventional thought [about the ecosystem] . . .”

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Many scholars dream of writing The Great Book on the determinism of the past. A challenge is to write it for a popular audience while retaining the excitement of narrative history.

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This fantastic book owes a great debt to Carl Sagan’s original Cosmos series and bestselling book.

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Readers interested in anthropology and the cultural exploration of why humans have created the idea of home and what this idea means will enjoy John S.

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In The Paradox of Evolution, physiologist Stephen Rothman claims to expose a major and neglected problem in Darwin’s theory of evolution, and it is a paradox: reproduction is purposeful, f

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“a challenging and informative look at the complex functioning of life processes.”

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Both Stuart Lowe and Chris North are astronomers, and together they have created a brilliant collection of infographics in order to make complex ideas graspable through visual representations.

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