Politics &Civil Rights

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“This book falls short of providing practical and achievable suggestions for achieving the goal of protecting people from sex classification based discrimination.”

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This timely publication addresses much of the misinformation about the trans community that persists despite increasing media coverage both popular and serious.

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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This is an important book on an important subject, but not for the faint-hearted in its very detailed treatment of the ebb and flow of citizenship recognition and rights for LGBT individuals in Ame

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Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

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One advantage of reviewing nonfiction books is learning about people who are often excluded from discussions. This usually happens with historical figures who happen to be women.

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This happy little stocking-filler is based on Sarah Galvin’s writing a column called "Wedding Crasher" for The Stranger newspaper in Seattle.

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It’s Not Over is Michelangelo Signorile’s rallying cry to gay America that despite the huge victories of same-sex marriage, and gays and lesbians being able to serve openly in the military

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“Who would have thought a book about the ACLU could be so titillating?”

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“Sister Spit is worth rooting for.”

This is the tale of the queer-cabaret version of Lollapalooza.