LGBTQ

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Historians, like archeologists, play an invaluable role uncovering all-but-forgotten people of the past, thus helping provide a better picture of the present.

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“Readers will shout and stomp; snort and yell, while reading Nasty Women. It is the perfect weapon for dispensing gut-ripping vitriol in the privacy of your own mind.”

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"The big surprise about David Sedaris’s new book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002), is how very good it is."

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“This book falls short of providing practical and achievable suggestions for achieving the goal of protecting people from sex classification based discrimination.”

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This timely publication addresses much of the misinformation about the trans community that persists despite increasing media coverage both popular and serious.

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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“Overall the book achieves its aim most efficiently and pleasurably, serving as an introduction to the academic world of Queer Theory . . .”

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This is an important book on an important subject, but not for the faint-hearted in its very detailed treatment of the ebb and flow of citizenship recognition and rights for LGBT individuals in Ame

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Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

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The GLBTQ art book to have this year is Gay Gotham: Art and Underground Culture in New York by Donald Albrecht and Stephen Vider, the companion book to the exhibit at the Museum of the Cit

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One advantage of reviewing nonfiction books is learning about people who are often excluded from discussions. This usually happens with historical figures who happen to be women.

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celebrates the still transgressive world of gay leathermen and Tom of Finland's place in Los Angeles’ architectural history.”

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Legalizing LGBT Families: How the Law Shapes Parenthood by Amanda K. Baumle and D’Lane R. Compton is an academic book based on a study that started in 2010.

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The travails experienced by transgender persons in the United States are receiving an increasing amount of publicity.

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This happy little stocking-filler is based on Sarah Galvin’s writing a column called "Wedding Crasher" for The Stranger newspaper in Seattle.

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The plight of homeless LGBT youth seldom gets the attention it deserves. Ryan Berg’s book No House to Call My Home is one man’s attempt to remedy that situation.

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“this coloring book falls flat.”

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Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed is a timely book for the discussion in current culture about the decision on not having kids.

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Writer Dale Peck was a journalism student at Columbia University when he joined ACT-UP at the height of the AIDS epidemic.

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It’s Not Over is Michelangelo Signorile’s rallying cry to gay America that despite the huge victories of same-sex marriage, and gays and lesbians being able to serve openly in the military

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After finishing After Woodstock: The True Story of a Belgian Movie, an Israeli Wedding, and a Manhattan Breakdown, the beleaguered reader cannot escape the fact that he knows more about

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“. . . a fearless truth-teller whose essays in Among the Bloodpeople are fully, unhesitatingly engaged . . .”

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