Popular Culture

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It’s become something of a cottage industry for publishers in recent times to take an address that a noted personage gives to a respected college or university and slap it between hard covers to se

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Camille Paglia’s relentlessly controversial public persona and pronouncements tend to overshadow her actual work.

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“one of the best books to come out in many months.”

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“Why are futurists so often wrong, and why do we even listen to them given their poor track record?”

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This is a handy little book for anybody interested in political activism, and perhaps even essential for someone trying alone to navigate the endless corridors of federal bureaucracy.

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If you are in search of or require a “how to” manual or a book that speaks of the usual icons of men’s style, then please move on as those aspects of men and their individual style are not containe

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What makes a tool superior to another . . . has nothing to do with how new it is. What matters is how it enlarges or diminishes us.“

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There is a reason that world renowned chefs like Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain are singing the praises of Table Manners: How to Behave in the Modern World and Why Bother—because the bo

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Morbid Curiosities is highly recommended for its lurid yet tasteful exploration of an otherwise ignored subculture of collecting.”

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Slim Aarons: Women is one of the most vividly and luxuriously documented books of its genre.

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Modern Life is an expedition through a universe of insightful images that chronicle artist and illustrator Jean Jullien’s perceptions and observations of 21st century life.

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"The hardest working dog in fashion."
—from T magazine

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Happy Anyway is a collection of short essays by current and past denizens of Flint, Michigan—the hometown of General Motors.

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Neil Leifer discovered "a camera could be my ticket to everywhere. A kind of magic carpet . . . to anyplace I wanted to go." That camera took him to fascinating places.

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If one picture is worth a thousand words then Night Flowers would be five complete sets of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

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This book addresses the issue of societal transformation “from male to female dominance” drawing on a range of statistical sources, publications, and anecdotal experiences, plus eight stories “from

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While academic readers interested in celebrity studies will want to pick up this slim volume, readers should be aware that the references made will be to primarily Indian culture and will be lost o

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A standup comic, according to Kliph Nesteroff’s interviewee Dick Curtis, was given its name by the mafia.

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“a fascinating source of material for those interested in visual anthropology and the impact of a developing urban art and social language.”

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Curvology purports to take us on “a scientific journey into the evolution of women’s bodies and what that means for their brains.” Engagingly, David Bainbridge attempts to diffuse the unea

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Without question Stoned is a book that can be absorbed or appreciated on many different levels.

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A rewarding collection whether read straight through or sampling here and there.”

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In the final minutes of Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas, Henry Hill (Ray Liotta) opens the door to his nondescript suburban home.

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