Travel

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The somnambulant city of Havana, long in a slumber of decay, now seems poised for a new chapter as the world starts “discovering” a new, open, thawing Cuba.

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“Salustri’s guide offers a delightful trip around and through this curious state.”

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Why are we so fascinated by photographs of pristine places? Escapism via armchair travel? Hunger to return to simpler times and less-trodden lands where nature still holds sway?

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“a compelling story conveying a powerful social and cultural critique along with a marvelous portrait of the beauties and wonders of Kenya . . .”

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“So many places, so little time,” warns the back cover of the third edition of this massive survey bursting with wonders throughout North America. Indeed, it’s hard to know where to begin.

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This city has captured headlines again this past year. Turkey’s tumult reminds readers of the position it occupies between East and West.

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“the explorer [tells] his own story, combining history, cartography, natural science, and a bit of a modern travelogue . . .”

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Novelist Russell Banks admits to having a serious case of wanderlust for the better part of half a century. Now 76, his international reputation as a writer in the grand tradition is secure.

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Richard Halliburton was a dashing American traveler, adventurer, and author, partly remembered today for being the first to swim the length of the Panama Canal and paying the lowest toll in its his

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Plato asserted that “What is honored in a country will be cultivated there.” If so,  it could be argued that the U.S.A. today honors computers, social media, and the iPhone.

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There was a time, and it was not so very long ago, when because we had read the texts of modern philosophy that had suddenly appeared in print, we contemplated Buddhism while we tuned the engines o

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As Peter Frankopan writes in The Silk Roads (reviewed in NYJB), islands are important for several reasons.

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Many scholars dream of writing The Great Book on the determinism of the past. A challenge is to write it for a popular audience while retaining the excitement of narrative history.

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Girl meets boy through an online dating account, and they take off to see the world after only a few weeks of dating.

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magical to read and a visual delight . . .”

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Billed as “a loving and hilarious, if occasionally spiky, valentine” to the author’s adopted country, Bill Bryson’s follow-up, two decades on, to his bestselling Notes from a Small Island,

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Brooklyn: A Personal Memoir by Truman Capote is a book you can risk judging by its cover art: a black and white photograph of a lithe Truman circa 1958 leaning on the sleepy back porch rai

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This book is disappointing.

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“Because of their bold decision to wander the globe in search of adventure, ‘We are healthier, happier, and more in touch with our world and our own selves.’”

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For three decades, Donna Leon has lived in Venice, the setting for her popular Commissario Guido Brunetti mysteries, a series distinguished by its engrossing plots, nuanced characterization, and mu

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“. . . best read in small sessions to avoid the armchair traveler’s inevitable reaction: ‘What were they thinking?’”

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“We live in a moment of history where change is so speeded up that we begin to see the present only when it is already disappearing.” —R. D. Laing

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“. . . an adventurous woman, willing herself to . . . push up against the outer boundaries of her comfort zone. . . . many comedic observations.”

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“For anyone contemplating visiting or living in The Netherlands, In the City of Bikes is a must read.”

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