Writing & Journalism

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There is something about a machine named the “bestseller-ometer” that has a snake oil feel to it, and yet The Bestseller Code by Jodie Archer and Matthew L.

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“A beautiful and unstinting look at the inner thoughts and difficult choices made by writers who dig past the false self to confront a truer, more honest version of themselves.”

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“Let’s get one thing straight right from the beginning,” says Mary Norris. “I didn’t set out to be a comma queen.

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“The Hollywood stereotype of the 19th century war correspondent, or any newspaperman of that period, was a young single white male with a penchant for alcohol and a dream of writing the gre

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Indexing is an art. Not everyone will find it interesting . . .

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“. . . does provide excellent guidance on structure and mechanics . . .”

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“With more than 80 contributors covering various aspect of speculative fiction, there is bound to be something for everyone.”

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Writing a book, any book, is a journey.

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“. . . will empower you to give the technique a try.”

Barbara Abercrombie has packed her extensive knowledge into an exercise book for writers.

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“Ms. Goldberg pushes the reader past fear and doubt into a glorious empowerment . . .”

The road to good writing does not proceed in a straight line.

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“To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction provides clues as to how one might aspire to write the way Mr. Lopate does.”

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“All writers, seasoned or newbie, should read, absorb, and put to use the lessons Don McNair offers . . .”

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“. . . learn to express yourself in a language that is in alignment with your true nature.”

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“. . . [a] worthwhile addition to any word-lover’s book shelf.”

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“. . . an honest portrayal of the battles of a few meant to benefit not only themselves but those who came after them.”

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“In Mr. Rowse’s opinion, what we may be losing in terms of linguistic perfection is actually leading us to communicate more and thus to greater understanding between people.