20th Century

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“Al Capone was a son, husband, and father who was looking for the best way to become a good provider for everyone.”

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This is not one Till tale but three. When young Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi, in 1955, his death changed the Civil Rights Movement and American history.

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Local history can be rich, exotic, complicated, personal, and dark but especially when an incident like the Scopes Monkey Trial serves as an “island” in regional and national social currents.

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In the opening pages of March: Book Three, the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama has just ended its Sunday school lessons when a bomb explodes.

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The War on Alcohol retells the story of Prohibition with a cocktail of case studies, legal analysis, and a broad scope.”

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New York City was the center of the world in the 1940s, according to author David Reid. He builds his case looking at the political and social scene of the decade.

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Sin, Sex and Subversion is a decent primer for students and laypeople unfamiliar with the history of human sexuality in the United States.

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Contraband Cocktails: How America Drank When It Wasn’t Supposed To by Paul Dickson is a slim volume of cocktail history and recipes.

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And Still I Rise: Black America Since MLK is a companion to a PBS series of the same name and chronicles the last 50 years of black history and culture in an illustrated timeline featuring

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“David McCullough does his usual excellent job of bringing his subjects to life, delving into their motivations and their impact on history.

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“An important and poetic look at life in WWII U.S. Japanese-American internment camps but one that fails to engage young readers with an empathetic main character.”

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The Burglary shows how a small group of committed individuals performed the bravest act of all, exposing Hoover . . .”

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“. . . fascinating . . .”

“. . . an interesting and accessible take on comics’ place in literature, popular culture, and women’s history.”

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“. . . does an excellent job of telling the story of one of America’s finest and darkest episodes in World War II . . .”

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“Mr. Burgin insists that the free-market era has still not ended, despite the market meltdown . . . Capitalism survives.”

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In this carefully prepared history dominated by the larger-than-life player Babe Ruth, author Robert Fitts corrects the errors of previous books about the famous baseball tour of Japan 1934.

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“Beyond classrooms, general readers will likely find a few of the selections compelling and the rest boorish and preachy.

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“Accessible to both undergraduates and postgraduates, this is an excellent statistical study.

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“While the two narratives— Lynne Cox’s and Amundsen’s—could be complementary, in South with the Sun they seem to be somewhat at odds with each other, as the only common ground betw

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“. . . a readable and informative history of the political, cultural, labor and religious undercurrents of life in Utah and, by extension, the U.S. . . .

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“My Uncle Martin’s Words for America not only honors Dr.

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