20th Century

“An important and poetic look at life in WWII U.S. Japanese-American internment camps but one that fails to engage young readers with an empathetic main character.”

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The Burglary shows how a small group of committed individuals performed the bravest act of all, exposing Hoover . . .”

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“. . . fascinating . . .”

“. . . an interesting and accessible take on comics’ place in literature, popular culture, and women’s history.”

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“. . . does an excellent job of telling the story of one of America’s finest and darkest episodes in World War II . . .”

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“Mr. Burgin insists that the free-market era has still not ended, despite the market meltdown . . . Capitalism survives.”

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In this carefully prepared history dominated by the larger-than-life player Babe Ruth, author Robert Fitts corrects the errors of previous books about the famous baseball tour of Japan 1934.

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“In moments like this, the reader wishes that Ms.

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“Beyond classrooms, general readers will likely find a few of the selections compelling and the rest boorish and preachy.

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“Accessible to both undergraduates and postgraduates, this is an excellent statistical study.

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“While the two narratives— Lynne Cox’s and Amundsen’s—could be complementary, in South with the Sun they seem to be somewhat at odds with each other, as the only common ground betw

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“. . . a readable and informative history of the political, cultural, labor and religious undercurrents of life in Utah and, by extension, the U.S. . . .

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“My Uncle Martin’s Words for America not only honors Dr.

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“‘Every new piece of information keeps me on the road to the ever-expanding possibility of the quest, a quest that in the end will still yield only partial knowledge—and will never give me,

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“A Secret Life is a masterfully researched biography.”

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“. . . a richly informative read, helped by Ms. McClear’s erudite, laconic style.

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“Blues fans believing they know blues history will be surprised by the fabrications and half-truths associated with the genre, as uncovered by semiotic analysis of the many code words, meta

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“a history of early American television telescoped through the persona and history of Julia Child. . . . fascinating . . .”

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The title is a bit of a misnomer. The subtitle is more accurate.

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In a world reeling from the news of the nuclear plant failures at Fukushima, no book could be more timely than Alexis Madrigal’s Powering the Dream.

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Then Everything Changed by Jeff Greenfield is an ambitious book that takes three important pieces of recent American presidential history and simply changes them.

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Veteran author Bill Bryson delights in skewering the arrogant rich in England and the United States, particularly the folks who lived in the 19th and early 20th centuries in this quirky survey book

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The title of this riveting book comes from Robert Johnson’s blues song, “Hellhound on My Trail,” which is about being pursued by fate, by the law, and ultimately, death.

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