Current/Public Affairs & Events

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"This is a book for everyone who has ever questioned the validity of the “war on drugs,” the “war on poverty,” or any other governmental attempt to solve social ills . . ."

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Brian Donovan’s newest study, Respectability on Trial: Sex Crimes in New York City, 1900–1918, is an invaluable addition to the ever-growing library of scholarly works on the history of Go

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“a refreshing look at the causes of mass incarceration . . . a must-read for anyone involved in the criminal justice reform movement.”

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The body of scholarship dedicated to analyzing, understanding, and changing America's enormous carceral complex is growing fast.

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Graeme Wood traces the origins of this work and his pursuit of greater understanding of the Islamic State to having almost been killed by a suicide bomber in Mosul in 2004.

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Residents in the newly formed United States of America may have witnessed its first national public relations campaign when Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay argued for a national con

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“this book shows, for the men serving on the front lines next to the Iron Curtain, conflict was always a real possibility that could happen at any time.”

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Brad Snyder’s new book The House of Truth is part intellectual history and part biography.

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The subtitle of this book is How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution, so you might think that Donald Trump plays the starring role in it. But you’d be wrong. He doesn’t.

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provides essential inspiration, information, resources, and insights.”

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“This is a must-read book for everyone who is debating the refugee crisis . . .”

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“a refreshing read that will most certainly enthrall true crime enthusiasts and those interested in the history of modern law enforcement . . .”

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If every journalist wrote like Patrick Kingsley, more people would likely be reading the critical nonfiction books of our time.

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As a somewhat jaded and world-weary incarcerated writer, rarely do I read something that makes me really mad.

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“The criminal justice system has adapted itself to the world of mass incarceration.”

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Malcolm Nance’s The Plot to Hack America is an essential primer for anyone wanting to be fully informed about the unprecedented events surrounding the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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John Avlon calls George Washington’s Farewell Address “the most famous American speech you’ve never read.” His new book, Washington’s Farewell, explores the history, intellectual formation

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This is a handy little book for anybody interested in political activism, and perhaps even essential for someone trying alone to navigate the endless corridors of federal bureaucracy.

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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Reading the musings of a Supreme Court Justice throughout her life would typically generate excitement only among legal scholars or law students.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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Rosa Brooks is a law professor at Georgetown who spent two years working at a senior level in the Pentagon.

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In 1852 Charles Dickens said of solitary confinement, "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain, to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body: and because its g

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This is not one Till tale but three. When young Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi, in 1955, his death changed the Civil Rights Movement and American history.

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