Literary Fiction

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“proves a compelling vehicle for a retelling of one of the world’s greatest stories.”

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Sir John Halberd is found dead in the Serpentine Lake in Hyde Park, London.

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Given his past works like the intricate and, let us say, expansive novel American Gods and his groundbreaking comic book, The Sandman, that helped define the nature of the graphic

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Few are aware of the trials faced by foreign nationals who live in the United Arab Emirates, also known as the Gulf States. News reports from the region focus more on the locals and their kings.

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A story of quiet rebellions, resilience and traditions, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane is a remarkable tale stretching three generations and two different count

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“The author has done a masterful job writing Kate Warne’s story in this eye-opening novel.”

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“Some novels . . . stay with us and haunt us . . . The Zero and the One is one of those tales.”

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Himself is a classic, feeding the reader through a multisensory smorgasbord of Irish euphemisms.   

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". . . Schlink’s brilliance as a contemplative writer. . ."

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 "If nothing else, The Fall of Lisa Bellow is a great character study of someone trying to survive growing up."

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Celine is the portrait of a remarkable woman: a plausible super-granny with endearing panache who helps heal broken hearts and wounded souls.”

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The visceral impact of Julianne Pachico’s prose . . . is enough to convince a reader that disorder is only a rock, a knock, or a gunshot away.”

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“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

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“Exit West is a smart, sympathetic, and deeply human story . . .”

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“Coover’s Huck Out West stands alongside Twain’s original as a worthy companion to that of the master storyteller of the 19th century.”

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Ayelet Gundar-Goshen’s (One Night, Markovitch) second novel Waking Lions starts as a moral drama in its first 14 chapters and becomes a suspenseful crime thriller in its final 11.

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“Buchanan writes with a sharp and original artist’s eye of her own.”

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Forget the ubiquitous British bulldog: spider-eyelashed girls, mini skirts riding ever upward, were liberation’s new logo in Swinging Sixties England.

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“a feel-good debut novel that’s hard to walk away from.”

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An unfinished science fiction novel by Nobel Prize winning poet Czeslaw Milosz . . . sounds intriguing doesn’t it? Unfortunately the pitch is much stronger than the final product.

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“a highly engaging, charming read . . .”

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". . . a gripping historical novel . . ."

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Is it better to leave the dead alone or bring them back into our lives?

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“Andrew Wyeth’s vision of her in the painting returns to Christina her sense of self, for she knows that through this painting she will be truly seen.”

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Encircling, the brilliantly structured first novel of a trilogy by Norwegian author Carl Frode Tiller, seamlessly translated by Barbara J.

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