Literary Fiction

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An unfinished science fiction novel by Nobel Prize winning poet Czeslaw Milosz . . . sounds intriguing doesn’t it? Unfortunately the pitch is much stronger than the final product.

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“a highly engaging, charming read . . .”

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Laurie Lico Albanese has written a gripping historical novel that revolves around the lives of two extraordinary women who live in extraordinary times.

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Is it better to leave the dead alone or bring them back into our lives?

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“Andrew Wyeth’s vision of her in the painting returns to Christina her sense of self, for she knows that through this painting she will be truly seen.”

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The Mother’s Promise is a chick-lit tearjerker that nevertheless conveys with sympathy and some depth the stories of four Northern California women who face difficult health and family pro

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Everyone has skeletons in their closets and deals with problems at one time or another.

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The Schooldays of Jesus explores a striking quest for meaning.”

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Encircling, the brilliantly structured first novel of a trilogy by Norwegian author Carl Frode Tiller, seamlessly translated by Barbara J.

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“there is a good deal to get excited about in pondering the future work of Chanelle Benz.”

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Georgia Hunter presumably loves her family and didn’t want to insult anyone when she set out to write a fictionalized account of how these well-to-do, assimilated Polish Jews survived the Holocaust

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“The novel’s mercurial prose may take some readers out of the reading experience, but then, this style is a bit of an acquired taste.”

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“a compelling story conveying a powerful social and cultural critique along with a marvelous portrait of the beauties and wonders of Kenya . . .”

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“I am a refugee who, like many others, has never ceased being a refugee in some corner of my mind.”

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Enigma Variations, the new novel by Andre Aciman, who previously presented us with that peach of a tale, Call Me By Your Name, has been packaged strangely.

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Reading Paul Auster’s novel 4 3 2 1 is a bit like wandering around in an old medina with Woody Allen and Leo Tolstoy.

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School is out and Xanther can finally spend more time with the little one, her white cat.

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After two novellas translated into English (Nowhere to be Found, 2015 and A Greater Music, 2016, the latter reviewed in NYJB) South Korean post-modernist fiction writer Bae Suah a

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Early in Sebastian Barry’s magnificent and boundless novel, Days Without End, young Thomas McNulty flees Ireland’s Great Famine: “I was among the destitute, the ruined, the starving. . .

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A curious word comes to mind in describing Margaret Atwood’s new novel Hag-Seed.

That word is effective.

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“Deeply engaged in the connection with the physical body and the human soul . . .”

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Louisiana writer Tim Gautreaux's latest offering, Signals: New and Selected Stories, collects twelve new short stories alongside nine others from his previous two collections, Same Pla

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The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson is a startling novel following the life of Persimmons Wilson, a former slave that fights in the Civil War, only to be imprisoned and hanged once he o

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Ultimately the people who love Swanson’s work will remember . . .

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a remarkable accomplishment in literary suspense.”

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