Cindy Helms

Cindy Helms is a visual artist, author, and illustrator known for designing unusual projects. For Ms. Helms, art is created from curious and whimsical combinations of mediums, shapes, textures and colors. Her artwork includes acrylic paintings, paper machè, mosaics, graphic design, and colored pencil illustrations. In her unique and simple children’s books, Ms. Helms' artwork comes to life in characters that enchant children and adults alike.

After many years as an IT manager, another many years as a stay-at-home mom, and yet another many years designing and building sets for musical theater productions, Ms. Helms has set her artistic self free launching her artwork into the professional arena with the publication of children's books: Who's New, and Outside, Inside (also in Spanish as Afuera, Adentro), and Polygonsters.

Ms Helms holds degrees from Depauw University and the University of Denver and continues to study, exploring artwork for children in particular on a daily basis.

Book Reviews by Cindy Helms

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Franklin’s Flying Bookshop is an easygoing narrative about sharing the love of reading with friends.

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“It is touching to make the realization that, when all else fails, one will never be alone while there exists a moon.”

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“Lines is subdued, yet powerful. Muted, yet vibrant. Classic, but fresh. In essence, a work of art.”

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Spanning a course of over 300 years (1277–early 1600s) and encompassing a legacy of no fewer than 50 Popes (Pope Nicholas III–Clement VIII), Art of Renaissance Rome provides a narrow cross

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“Art Up Close contains great variety, excellent selection, and attractive presentation: a wonderful way to teach art history.”

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“This is one fun, lively, and attractive book.”

Innovative design combines with traditional story telling in the sweet and simple The Quiet Crocodile.

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Paper artist Dennis (Papercut Wilderness, 2017) and children’s activity book writer Hutchinson (Neon Nature Colouring & Sticker Activity Book, 2016), both based in England, ma

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“With captivating characters, smart text and free-flowing illustrations The Cranky Caterpillar will resonate beautifully with readers.”

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“a very good book.”

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“a beautiful if hefty volume that will serve well as a fundamental study of de Kooning.”

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Elaborate and detailed illustrations dominate this story of a grumpy girl named Ivy and the lonely little raincloud who befriends her.

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13 Art Materials Children Should Know is the latest installment to Prestel’s Children Should Know series.

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Good Wives and Warriors, aka Becky Bolton and Louise Chappell, let out all the stops in this highly imaginative coloring book.

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“a super-engaging and thoughtful book, just fine for a quick and casual read, but better for a lingering one.”

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Honar: The Afkhami Collection of Modern and Contemporary Iranian Art is an incredible journey through a foreign Middle East world that is, for many Americans, veiled in taboo, fear, and mi

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What do an East African oryx, a turquoise-browed motmot, a Malayan tapir, an echidna, and kelp gull have in common?

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The Instill and Inspire volume is a comprehensive presentation of works lovingly and intentionally brought together by an African American couple, for African American artists, on behalf o

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“Type Tells Tales widens typographical horizons, showcasing a variety of creative ways artists push the design boundaries of traditional lettering.”

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“inviting and engaging . . . a well-presented lure into the potentially overwhelming world of art history.”

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Why is an armadillo covered in armor? Just how lazy is a sloth? Why does a beaver chomp through trees? Just what is a binturong?

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Absurd and atypical anecdotes pair up with bewildered drawings in Leonora Carrington’s The Milk of Dreams. A good choice for young readers looking for something different.

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If one were to think that nothing more could possibly be written about the iconic Georgia O’Keeffe that hasn’t already been researched, analyzed, or discussed, then one has not yet perused this gem

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Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) was a German philosopher with controversial theories about everything from art, literature, politics, economics, and the gamut in between.

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“this nonfiction book on electricity touches on nothing factual and goes no further in explaining electricity than the plug and the wire.”

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The color blue holds many meanings both positive and negative. In many faith traditions the color is symbolic of virtue, holiness, or of the divine.

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As one of the most internationally renowned artists, René Magritte (1898–1967) was also one of the strangest, a testament to his mastery of the surrealist style.

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Of Dogs and Other People: The Art of Roy De Forest does a wonderful job of presenting both the person of Roy De Forest and the artwork he created.

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Author and illustrator Roger Duvoisin (1900–1980) was a Swiss artist who immigrated to the United States in the late 1920s.

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“This story is a gem, rich with artistry and meaning.”

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“a treasure that will lure a new generation of readers, rendering them life-long fans of Pettson and Findus.”

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“a very readable and enjoyable picture book.”

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“a charming and very satisfying read.”

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Chelo Manchego tackles a poignant and universal issue in his book The Want Monsters.

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Who knew that a basic, everyday umbrella could be more than a simple shelter from the weather? The five imaginative, fun loving characters in The Green Umbrella certainly did.

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“a remarkable job of taming a wealth of loony and preposterous Dalian information into a fun, well presented, and entirely manageable package.”

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When an Elephant Falls in Love is an adorable story with a sneak peek into the heart of love’s first nibbles. It is sweet and simple, tender and relatable.

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“one of the most influential French artists of the 20th century . . .

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Rudy, a naively determined and enthusiastically optimistic tree frog, joins the ranks of SpongeBob and Dory as Brian Smith and Mike Raicht team up to deliver another fun and adventurous graphic nov

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The team of Heinz Janisch and Lisbeth Zwerger returns with a revision of Stories of the Bible, originally published in 2002.

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“. . . a lesson about knowing what it takes to be an artist. A lesson about accepting and respecting our unique stories and points of view.”

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Show & Tell Me the World by Tom Schamp is an oversized picture book dictionary with a smattering of everything from houses and food to the four seasons; from air, land, and sea creatur

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The Cantankerous Crow by Lennart Hellsing and Poul Strøyer is a retelling of a classic Swedish tale from the 1950s.

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“bold and beautifully designed . . . eye catching and informative.”

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Just in time for winter! Cartoonist Chris Britt has created a wonderful, wintery, warm-hearted tale ready for the ranks of Rudolph and Frosty.

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Before even opening the book Ship of Dreams by Dean Morrissey, the cover illustration is enchanting, luring, and curiosity piquing, beckoning one to a realm of dreamy fantasy and nostalgia

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Vincent Van Gogh was one of those artists who brought the fullness of his unique character to his lifestyle, his relationships, and his artwork.

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Jon Klassen returns with the third installation of the Hat trilogy.

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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles, written by Michelle Cuevas with illustrations by Erin Stead, is unique in its story and powerfully engaging.

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Claire Garralon’s Black Cat & White Cat is a short, simple walk through a world of visual contrast.

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Avi’s story collection The Most Important Thing brings to life seven very real family situations and experiences that are quite common today.