Paul LaRosa

Paul LaRosa is a three-time Emmy Award winning journalist and a producer at the CBS News broadcast 48 Hours. He also was one of the producers on the acclaimed documentary 9/11 which was seen by 40 million viewers when it first aired on CBS six months after the collapse of the World Trade Center Towers.

A native of New York, Mr. LaRosa was formerly a reporter at The New York Daily News and has written for The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, the Huffington Post, and many other publications. He is also the author of four true crime books and a memoir: Leaving Story Avenue: My Journey from the Projects to the Front Page. He also writes a near-daily blog which can be found on his website.

Book Reviews by Paul LaRosa

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Novelists are not immune to what’s going on around them and clearly author Brian Platzer, who lives in the largely black and gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant, has drawn on hi

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In case the nonstop celebration commemorating the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ Sgt.

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If you loved the television series Mad Men, hanker for a time when jewel thieves were referred to as “gentlemen,” and wish all business lunches revolved around three or more martinis, then

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Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson is the story of Mary Addison who allegedly murdered a baby girl when she was only nine years old.

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Imagine you’re a young mother whose two children have vanished. Imagine you’re divorced and sleeping around. Imagine you’re a waitress who likes provocative clothes and makeup.

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The hero of this first-in-a-series novel by Rob McCarthy derives its title from a poem by T. S. Eliot.

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The setting for this debut novel by Lindsey Lee Johnson is a high school in the over-privileged enclave of Mill Valley, California.

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The very idea of a high-gloss, pricey photo book about the Sex Pistols seems ludicrous on the face of it.

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Generally, books about the Beatles can be divided into two groups, either the all-encompassing history of the band (Tune In by Mark Lewisohn is of course the best example but far from the

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Paul Du Noyer has set himself up with this book because, honestly, what else is there to say about Paul McCartney?

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clever and full of twists . . . a story well told.”

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As author Leon Wildes himself admits, this book has been a long time coming. John Lennon fought his immigration battle against “the USA” back in the early 1970s.

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"Siracusa is an easy, engaging read that should find itself on many vacation reading lists."

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William Faulkner famously wrote, “The past is never dead.

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Imagine being Moby, the musician who just happens to be an actual descendant of Herman Melville (which is where Moby gets his nickname, get it?), and you’re asked to write your memoirs without the

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Writing an all-encompassing book about the life of Paul McCartney is akin to writing the definitive biography of Jesus Christ.

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Long before Etan Patz disappeared on his way to school in SoHo, and long before parents suspected the worst might happen to their children at any moment, an 11-year-old boy was kidnapped and murder

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Bohman’s prose is the literary equivalent of an undertow.”

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The woman at the center of Mona Awad’s novel 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl has a problem, and because even the word is so loaded within the context of this book, one hesitates to call i

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The couple at the heart of this novel—Rob Beauman and Ellie Larrabee—appear on the surface to have everything.

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a singular voice . . .”

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If timing were everything, this memoir would be No. 1 on all the bestseller lists, getting released the week of David Bowie’s unfortunate death and the release of his latest album.

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She can write like no one else.”

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It’s easy to think of Carly Simon—gorgeous, tall, and talented—as swanning through her charmed celebrity life.

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The Kitchen is a trade paperback billed as a “reimagining” of the mob novel for a new generation. The question is which generation?

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It’s 1978 and John Lennon has taken off from everyone and everything he knows to find peace in his soul and songs in his psyche.