Journalism

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Who Shot Sports is an engrossing photo exhibition between covers that more than proves the truism that a picture is, indeed, worth a thousand words.

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his writing can be luxuriated in.

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The indisputable observation that can be made after reading Amy Odell’s supposedly truthful parody is that this is the fashion business in the age of the Internet as seen by a millennial.

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Julia Martin has done a fine job of bringing Gary Snyder to the fore in her committed study of one of our major contemporary authors.”

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Under the Wire is dramatic, brisk, entertaining at times, deeply emotional, and above all, beautifully told.

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“. . . a unique, superb, and original piece of first-person journalism . . . this inside view of chaos and anarchy is priceless.”

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Jorge Luis Borges is considered the patron saint of computer programmers for his mastership of infinity and self-reflection, and Borges at 80 is a reprint of the same title published by th

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“. . . part Isaac Asimov, part P. T. Barnum, and part Charles Fort, a legendary American icon . . .”

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“. . . [a] worthwhile addition to any word-lover’s book shelf.”

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It is delightful that a respected linguist would take up the challenge of writing about an inelegant word that has become a staple of our spoken language.

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“How many other magazines of any kind of during that era that included articles about Zen Buddhism, diamond shopping, and art appreciation—all with a masculine slant?”

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“Alan Moore: Conversations is undoubtedly a definitive, scholarly collection for Mr. Moore’s fans, but as the book’s editor Eric Berlatsky points out: ‘. . .

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“Richard Poplak compellingly combines a selection of Igor Kenk’s own words with clever and pointed commentary to create a remarkable narrative.

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“The Next Day is a creative and worthy undertaking, a unique and powerful discussion of an issue that is at once growing in pervasiveness and intensely tragic and troubling.”

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“Brand Thinking and Other Noble Pursuits is valuable primarily for those particularly interested in what the gurus of the branding industry have to say about where branding was in

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“This biography could have easily been titled The Tale of Two Colberts; however, Colbert’s signature ‘truthiness’ seems to befit the style and enjoyment Ms.

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“. . . thorough, thoughtful, and exceptionally well written. . . . Page One is a most encompassing volume on the issue of the future of journalism and newspapers. . . .