Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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At the University of Pennsylvania, where I teach memoir, I’ve started a tradition.

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“Yes, I believe [Steven] Avery is innocent. This is my opinion, which I know is not worth very much, but my opinion is based on an assessment of the evidence.”
—Jerome F. Buting

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“a delight as well as a revelation.”

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British classical pianist James Rhodes is a rebel with a cause as he unleashes his iconoclastic view of the vaulted world of classical music in concert halls and on British TV and in the streets an

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In this nonfiction work, the granddaughter of the late Abraham Zapruder relates the circumstances surrounding the filming of President Kennedy’s assassination on November 22, 1963, in Dallas, TX.

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“a marvelous companion to this series, with wonderful illustrations and an engaging backstory . . .”

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Title IX of the Educational Amendments Act of 1972 transformed women’s sports in America and is now a familiar historical marker.

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Claretta Pitacci, although not the only mistress to Italian Prime Minister and dictator, Benito Mussolini, is possibly best known as the one who died with him.

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In The Pen and the Brush, the versatile biographer Anka Muhlstein explores some of the complex and fascinating relationships that have existed between painters and novelists.

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“Love the music, love the man, read the book.  “

 

“Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” —Attributed to many

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Kahlil Gibran’s prose, visual art and advocacy for transcultural unity made him a citizen of the world during his lifetime, admired in the east and west.

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William Merritt Chase (1849–1916) is a pivotal figure in the history of American art. He was a contemporary of James Whistler and John Singer Sargent.

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“This book is a breath of fresh air.”

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One of the titans of 20th century American literature, Ernest Hemingway was larger than life and an adventurer of the first rank. He was also imperfect, flawed and, therefore, human.

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Reading the musings of a Supreme Court Justice throughout her life would typically generate excitement only among legal scholars or law students.

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Susan Quinn’s new book addresses a facet of Eleanor Roosevelt’s life that has been hinted at but never fully developed.

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“an extraordinary and thought provoking view on the playwright’s life and works.”

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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Denied the kind of shapely body and beautiful face that made Hollywood producers see stars, but gifted with a razor-sharp mind and a motor mouth, Joan Alexander Molinsky made the best of her talent

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The very idea of a high-gloss, pricey photo book about the Sex Pistols seems ludicrous on the face of it.

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Charles “Sonny” Liston, former heavyweight champion turned drug dealer, was found dead in his Las Vegas home on January 5, 1971.

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“I believe life happens and you soldier through the worst of it with your head held high and give thanks to God for the rest of it.”

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“Al Capone was a son, husband, and father who was looking for the best way to become a good provider for everyone.”

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