Rita Lorraine Hubbard

Rita Lorraine Hubbard was a special educator for 20+ years with an advanced degree in School Psychology. She is currently a full-time children’s book writer, offering tips to aspiring writers at “Rita Writes History,” a blog that has attracted over 230,000 visitors. She founded and manages Picture Book Depot, a children’s book review website that enjoys a global audience and offers free books to children. She is also an ESL educator, designing and implementing conversational English lessons for South Korean businesspersons.

In 2010, Ms. Hubbard served as Lead Historical Researcher (Chattanooga Unit) for NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are” series, featuring the life of megastar Lionel Richie. Her article, “Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know About Getting a Grant (But Were Afraid to Ask),” was assumed by Google Knols and For Dummies® online, and she wrote and coproduced the global short film Cinema Prosperite’ Film Competition finalist, An Entrepreneur’s Heart in 2009. In addition, her nonfiction reference book, African Americans of Chattanooga: A History of Unsung Heroes was published in 2008.

When Ms. Hubbard isn’t writing or researching, she spends her time searching for the next bold and beautiful picture book to review.

Book Reviews by Rita Lorraine Hubbard

Reviewed by: 

Superman: The Golden Age Omnibus, Volume 3 is the third installment in the Superman Omnibus series. It is comprised of Action Comics No. 48–65, Superman No.

Reviewed by: 

The new picture book by the late Walter Dean Myers called Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is more than the simple story of a slave’s life and how events and people dictated

Reviewed by: 

The world’s most famous Venus flytrap detective is back on the case in author Tom Angleberger’s latest picture book installment, Inspector Flytrap: The Goat Who Chewed Too Much.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There is a new picture book by award-winning author and Sesame Street contributor and animator Gene Barretta called Muhammad Ali: A Champion Is Born, and it is lovely beyond words.

Reviewed by: 

Time is gone . . . absolutely, completely, inexplicably gone.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

will . . . fire the imaginations of emerging writers, readers, and movie buffs.”

Reviewed by: 

Author Sybille Titeux and Dark Horse Comics have teamed up to release a timely and sweeping graphic novel called Muhammad Ali that should literally blow fans of the boxing legend’s minds.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Humans have long had a love affair with cuddly bears. Think Winnie the Pooh, Baloo from The Jungle Book, and everyone’s wise-cracking favorite, Yogi!

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Lovely. Simply lovely.”

Reviewed by: 

In author/illustrator Andy Warner’s latest graphic novel, Brief Histories of Everyday Objects, just about every major object invented on planet earth is featured in black-and-white comic s

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Many years ago, author and illustrator Ashley Bryan came into possession of an “Appraisement of the Estate” document involving 11 slaves, some cattle, and some cotton that were about to be put up f

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

I Am Jane Goodall by Brad Meltzer is the latest installment in the Ordinary People Change the World series of books, created to introduce young children to historical heroes. Ms.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

In author Andrea Beaty’s lively new rhyming picture book called Ada Twist, Scientist, young Ada Marie begins life as a quiet and unassuming baby who doesn’t talk until she turns three.

Reviewed by: 

The Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary may sound like the title of a stuffy and ordinary old dictionary, but that’s just not true.

Reviewed by: 

In Armstrong: The Adventurous Journey of a Mouse to the Moon by author-illustrator Torben Kuhlmann furry and meticulous little Armstrong stands on a stack of boxes and cartons each night,

Reviewed by: 

In the hilarious new picture book called Inspector Flytrap: Book 1 by Tom Angleberger the cerebral Inspector Flytrap is a—well, flytrap.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

It’s never too early to begin teaching children about the way America’s voting system works, and this is the premise of author Bonnie Worth’s new rhyming picture book, One Vote, Two Votes, I Vo

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

In author Mara Rockliff’s enchanting new picture book Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragists, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles, it’s April, 1916—a presidential election year—and two ram

Reviewed by: 

It’s pretty astonishing that an animal dubbed as “monstrous” and “frightful” could win the hearts of people from one end of Europe to the other, but that is exactly what happens in author Emily Arn

Reviewed by: 

Megalopolis and the Visitor from Outer Space by Clea Dieudonne, may be one of the most unique picture books out there for children ages four to eight—not necessarily because of its story l

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In Paws of Courage: True Tales of Heroic Dogs That Protect and Serve by Nancy Furstinger, readers get a bird’s-eye—make that dog’s-eye—view of the fast-paced lives of military dog

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The fast-paced prose is just as much fun as the illustrations and manages to shine the light on the Great Blondin’s humor as well as his singleness of purpose.”

Reviewed by: 

Fun and necessity all rolled up in one; that’s the only way to describe National Geographic Kids’ new pocket-sized handbook, 100 Things to Know Before You Grow Up.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Children ages four to eight naturally ask a lot of “how” questions, and National Geographic Kids Little Kids First Big Book of How by Jill Esbaum attempts to answer every single one of the

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Heroes don’t have to be big. They don’t even have to be human.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

In Little Worm’s Big Question by Eva Schlunke, a tiny worm who feels bullied and ignored takes a wise little grasshopper’s advice and sets out to find what makes him special to the world.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

It is always exciting to discover real-life heroes you never heard of before, especially when the hero is a cross-dresser, impersonator, nurse, Civil War soldier, and spy all rolled into one—and he

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Valentine’s Day is coming and so is author Eve Bunting’s latest picture book, Mr. Goat’s Valentine.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Young children have always been among the most vulnerable members of society, and yet they have not always been regarded as such.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

True picture book lovers will be bowled over with National Geographic Kids latest title, Why? Over 1,111 Answers to Everything by Crispin Boyer.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Author Eve Bunting’s new picture book, Frog and Friends Celebrate Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Eve, will keep readers smiling from the beginning of the book to the very end.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Brainy books aren’t for everyone, but if you’re one of those who love everything “brain” including how your brain works, how it perceives and relays those perceptions to you, and how—in many ways—i

Genre(s):
None
Reviewed by: 

If you know little or nothing about the shocking life of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer, this new picture book can get you all caught up.

Reviewed by: 

There is so much of history that we are still unaware of, so many tidbits waiting patiently to be discovered.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“perfect for young children just learning America’s history, long-time history buffs, and readers who love a stroll down memory lane . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Genius is all around us, yet it can still be a challenging concept to define. Thankfully, author Deborah Kespert seems to have found a delightful way to tell the story of genius.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“the perfect keepsake for history lovers everywhere.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Young children love asking “how” and “why” questions almost as much as they love flipping through lively and colorful picture books.

Reviewed by: 

The self-publishing phenomenon is upon us.” 

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Many of our best childhood memories center around thumbing through old scrapbooks or digging through old foot lockers.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

This simple book may be even more important than its author/illustrator knows.”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

this book contains everything you need to bug out (live in the wilderness) or bug in (hide at home) while the undead roam the earth.”

Reviewed by: 

Little Melba and Her Big Trombone is a finger-popping slice of history that offers a peep-hole into the little-known world of a female jazz players of the 1920s.”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“This action-packed, gore-filled book is not for the faint-of-heart—but then, science has never been for the squeamish.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

My Animal Book: Facts and Fun Questions and Answers, Things to Make and Do is a combination fact book, puzzle book, and game and activity book.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

This book is designed to be a thorough course in speed racing for children.

Reviewed by: 

This book is like a key to opening doors across educational and medical landscapes. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Sometimes there’s no explaining how a person manages to work his or her way into your heart. It just happens.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
None
Reviewed by: 

Superman isn’t the only one with X-ray vision.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Too Much Glue cleverly captures young children’s love of art, hands-on construction, and messy glue and combines it all with the wonder of boundless imagination. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a timely book . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a versatile book . . . part entertaining picture book, part mini-encyclopedia . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“This book should flourish wherever it is found . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“This quiet book touches upon very important topics that are just as relevant today.”

Genre(s):
None
Reviewed by: 

“. . . [a] hauntingly familiar storyline about how the best things in life are free—and are for everyone.”

Reviewed by: 

Stumbling upon a childhood photo can be an unexpected pleasure for an elderly person—except when it conjures up memories of the Holocaust.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . an extraordinary story of one teen’s courage and determination as a bloody battle rages all around her.”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . sidesplitting . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . enjoy this book for its simple premise, its rich and colorful illustrations, and its funny storyline, . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a perfect addition to a preschool bookshelf . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Wild Boy: The Real Life of the Savage of Areyron by Mary Losure is the story of a ten-year-old orphan boy living naked, wild, and alone in the woods until he is finally captured by hunters

Reviewed by: 

“. . .

Reviewed by: 

Easter will be here in no time, and parents who are trying to decide how to introduce this eggy tradition to their little ones may find a little board book called Ollie’s Easter Egg by Oli

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . a beauty to behold.”

Reviewed by: 

“Cheer Up, Mouse! is adorable.”

Reviewed by: 

“If the reader has not read the first book, he or she won’t have a clue what is going on . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Wyatt Burp Rides Again (The Adventures of Jo Schmo) definitely qualifies as a ‘best’ children’s book.”

Reviewed by: 

“In addition to being just plain fun, this creative book should be great at whetting an infant’s appetite for food—and his appetite for books as well.”

Reviewed by: 

“A wonderfully lamb-filled experience . . .”

Reviewed by: 

. . . the only thing better than not having to go to bed at bedtime is finding out bedtime no longer exists.”

Reviewed by: 

Since the beginning of time and the formation of the family as a unit, parents have faced the daunting task of enforcing bedtime even as their drowsy-eyed children argue that they’re simply “not sl

Reviewed by: 

“Noah Webster and His Words has something for everyone: nostalgia, history, entrepreneurism, and last but not least, a few good old-fashioned belly laughs.”

Reviewed by: 

“The sweetly repetitive language delivered with just the right amount of parental love emphasizes a larger concept: similarity by virtue of the simple state of being human.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a Christmas book with a twist to delight audiences young and old.”

Reviewed by: 

Christmas is known for lots of things: giving, receiving, long-time-no-see faces, egg nog, hot chocolate, and shredding wrapping paper to get to the wonderful gift inside.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a smart book that is also a powerful teaching tool.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a great addition to any child’s personal library.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . these five little monkeys will become as memorable and well-loved to toddlers as the other mischievous little monkeys who once jumped on the bed.”