Food Writing

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“a delicious way to taste history. . . . highly recommended.”

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By any measure food blogging has given voice to the home cook. As its ranks continue to grow it is proof positive that we humans are the cooking animal. We are also the storytelling animal.

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At first glance, the title of this book was somewhat off putting. That quickly changed.

Food and travel writing can be dull.

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This charming little ode to the ingredients used in the Italian cooking of Marcella Hazan in a sense is as important to cooking as any of her cookbooks.

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“chock full of delectable morsels to keep even the most discerning reader sated.”

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Carlo Petrini, the founder of Slow Food, the worldwide grassroots organization, and the author of Slow Food Nation, exudes so much joy, hope, and optimism in his new book that it’s hard no

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“This is how modernism works. It is an ongoing conversation among the chef, the diner, the ingredients, and our collective memories.”

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“Taste happens in our head, not in our mouth, and the art of the table today is as robust as it was in the 18th century.”

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“. . . enough variety, like a box of chocolates, that one can poke around the book looking for the one with caramel and find it.”

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“This is why (if you can afford it) we are willing to pay so much to eat in a restaurant like Daniel rather than attempt to cook his dishes at home. . . .

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The Stop is Nick Saul and Andrea Curtis’ chronicle of a journey that changed a cramped, mouse-infested food bank into a major center for social change in the city of Toronto.

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“If this book doesn’t put you in touch with your inner Viking, I don’t know what would. . . . If you buy only one cookbook this season, let it be Fäviken.

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“. . . chockfull of revelations that any cooking enthusiast will eat up with a spoon.”

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“Although The Expert Cook in Enlightenment France covers a time period far removed from our own, the 18th century trend toward simple and more natural food reflects our own time in

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“This is a book that strives to be inclusive but comes off as solidly elitist.”

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“The push-pull of Ms. Bijan’s relationship with her parents during their grief as she came of age will feel familiar to many readers, but the details of Ms. Bijan’s life will not. . . .

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“. . . take a closer look. This book was written to be used. Tips on how to improve your technique, as well as highlights of interesting ingredients are sprinkled throughout.

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“Part memoir, part teaching manual, The Kitchen Counter Cooking School is as much a transformational book about Kathleen Flinn as it is about her students. . . .