General

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“. . . one of those fun and usable cookbooks that will be marked, tagged, dog-eared, and dripped on with yet another secret sauce.”

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“Because the pizza dough recipe and technique are now widely available online, cooks will appreciate the more unusual toppings and sides that make My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Mak

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“. . . take a closer look. This book was written to be used. Tips on how to improve your technique, as well as highlights of interesting ingredients are sprinkled throughout.

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“In her new book, Cook Like a Rock Star, Chef Burrell not only tells the how, but also the why of cooking; and, best of all, she does something truly amazing—she makes cooking fun

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“It’s difficult to do justice to the 750 recipes and the overall presentation, except to say that this book never goes on the shelf—it never leaves the countertop, where it is always within

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Like his London restaurant, The Dock Kitchen, Stevie Parle’s first cookbook, My Kitchen: Real Food from Near and Far, is unconventional.

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There are some books that one needs to buy the new edition of every year. The Gambero Rosso Italian Wines series is one of those sets.

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Like the EatingWell magazine covers, The Simple Art of EatingWell proclaims its allegiances up front, with a cover shot of twine-bound asparagus spears.

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The Food Substitutions Bible does not, at first glance, look like a book to snuggle under the covers with and read for a while.

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If “one-pot dishes” makes you think just of soups and stews, One-Pot Dishes for Every Season aims to widen your horizons.

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Here’s a book that is sure to show up on nearly every foodie’s holiday wish list this season.

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Which cooks will appreciate Bonnie Stern’s Friday Night Dinners?

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Unless you are a regular reader of the New York Times weekly column “The Minimalist,” you've probably never heard of Mark Bittman.