Sharon Kebschull Barrett

Sharon Kebschull Barrett, the author of Desserts from an Herb Garden and Morning Glories (St. Martin’s Press), specializes in food writing and recipe development, worked as a freelance copy editor, periodically teaches cooking classes, and previously owned Dessert First, a custom bakehouse. In the kitchen since she was three years old, Barrett focuses on baking, and especially loves garden-based baking, bringing vibrant, interesting flavors to all her sweets.

Ms. Barrett writes about creating sweet memories with your children at http://allsweetmemories.com. 

More information on Ms. Barrett can be found at her website.

Book Reviews by Sharon Kebschull Barrett

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“bakers can find months of inspiration and experimentation, from cocktails to dessert, in this cookie collection.”

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To open the pages of Golden is to be immediately confronted with a dilemma: Keep reading or race to the kitchen?

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“for confident cooks who can spot when a recipe might go awry, Biscuit Head provides good inspiration for updated Southern classics.”

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On first read, Nancy Silverton’s Mozza at Home feels appealing, reassuring, and aspirational.

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“Classic German Baking lives up to its name—and will be a classic itself.”

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For Americans, the bar to be charmed by anything British gets set plenty low. We love the accent, the funny words, the history, the royal baby. And we used to love making fun of the food.

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It’s hard to slam a book whose authors really, really want readers to like them.

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“In an uncertain, overstressed world, full flavor + comfort seems an ideal combination.”

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“nothing too exotic, but with just enough of a twist to keep bakers and breakfast-eaters happy.”

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Feeling uncool in the kitchen? Need a lot more hipster at your stove?

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Careful now: Open your copy of Southern Fried and listen—do you hear all those people talking back to James Villas?

“No, no, no, those fried green tomatoes need more flour!”

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The Glorious Vegetables of Italy delivers what it promises . . . but do you need what it promises?

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For all the pie books out in recent years, most people can probably name only one or two friends, at best, who approach pie-making without fear.

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Some books can win a reader over by simply looking “right.” Cuisine Niçoise does just that: This lovely book design perfectly fits its theme of French Riviera cooking and the sweet, slight

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“. . . will remind longtime cooks why learning about cooking satisfies their souls, and give every cook . . . many reasons to hit the kitchen.”

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“. . . a charming book . . . but a bit of a tease.”

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“. . . deserving of a place on a baker’s shelves—even if other pie books got there first.”

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“Fifty dollars for a book as hideously edited/translated as this one? What an insult to readers.

Gorgeous. Unwieldy. Riddled with errors.

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“Intimidating but hardly impossible, these recipes put an exclamation mark on Pie It Forward’s case for the demise of cupcakes.”

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“Because the pizza dough recipe and technique are now widely available online, cooks will appreciate the more unusual toppings and sides that make My Pizza: The Easy No-Knead Way to Mak

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“Once you start, it may be hard to stop. Even a first skim through the book will likely lead to many pages marked for further testing . . .

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John Besh doesn’t mince words.

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“The book breaks down its recipes into comfortably useful chapters on antipasti, soup, sandwiches, salads, pasta, vegetables, seafood, meat, and desserts.

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“The push-pull of Ms. Bijan’s relationship with her parents during their grief as she came of age will feel familiar to many readers, but the details of Ms. Bijan’s life will not. . . .

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“With the idea of writing a book for the ultimate cookie swap—one with perfect, cheflike confections—Tracey Zabar began hitting up mostly New York chefs and bakers for their best recipes.

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“From the lurid pink cover onward, Baking Style author Lisa Yockelson goes straight for over-the-top . . .

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First things first: There are biscuits in this book. They are not the biscuits that made the Loveless Café famous. Sorry, Loveless lovers.

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Hey y’all, think you might could mosey down to the Delta with Martha Hall Foose for some good eatin’ and readin’?

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Following Phileas Fogg’s route, with detours thrown in for more tasty bites, food and travel writer Nan Lyons offers a tour of her favorite stops in Around the World in Eighty Meals.

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Do you:
a) Think food and high-tech belong in the same sentence;
b) Own at least one smoker;
c) Travel with your whipped cream canister and multiple cartridges;

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Like the EatingWell magazine covers, The Simple Art of EatingWell proclaims its allegiances up front, with a cover shot of twine-bound asparagus spears.

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The Food Substitutions Bible does not, at first glance, look like a book to snuggle under the covers with and read for a while.

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At almost 4 ½ pounds, the heft of Sarabeth’s Bakery suggests serious satisfaction for the sweet tooth.

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If “one-pot dishes” makes you think just of soups and stews, One-Pot Dishes for Every Season aims to widen your horizons.

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How would you define a cake? Do churros, sweet tamales, empanadas, baklava, or saffron buns come to mind?

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Which cooks will appreciate Bonnie Stern’s Friday Night Dinners?

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In the competitive world that is kids’ birthday parties, Liv and Kaye Hansen can help any mom stand tall.

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Can a cook’s shelves hold too many ice cream books? Not with summer looming, and not if there’s still space for The Ciao Bella Book.

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In many ways, The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook couldn’t be more perfectly timed.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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Bakers who already own Room for Dessert and Ripe for Dessert know they can trustpastry chef and cookbook author David Lebovitz to provide reliable, delicious recipes.

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We can only hope that the bacon craze, now a bit revolting in its ever-so-American excesses, has passed its peak.

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While she was the pastry chef at The French Laundry, Claire Clark wrote Indulge in 2007; now released in paperback, the book remains a must-have.

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It’s tough to throw around descriptions such as “legendary,” and “arguably the very best to be found on the planet,” and live up to them with something as simple as a brownie.

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Would you like some sugar with your sugar? If so, Dulce is the book for you. This is a book that more than lives up to its name.