David Rosman

David Rosman, MA, has settled down in the “middle of Middle America” where he is an internationally read commentator for the Columbia Missourian (Columbia, MO) and InkandVoice.com, as well as a reviewer for the New York Journal of Books.

Mr. Rosman is the author or contributing editor to twelve-professional development textbooks and more than 50 articles concerning professional and political communication.

Active in local, state and national politics, Mr. Rosman has run for political office, and has served as campaign and communication manager for candidate and issue campaigns. He is also an ordained minister with the Universal Life Church. Today his focus is on politics and religion, and he is a nationally known speaker on the subject of “Church and State.”

Mr. Rosman invites you to join him on all the social networking sites as well as on his own website, so you can follow his newest commentaries and his speaking calendar.

Book Reviews by David Rosman

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“Did Thielen convince me that one sect of Christianity is better than another? The simple answer is no.

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“This is a fascinating journey through one of the most important speeches in American and world history.

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“As a suicide attempt survivor, I found this book most enlightening.”

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“. . . fascinating . . .”

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Opening the pages of Kylie’s Heel the reader is brought quickly and intimately into the world of Kylie Morgan, columnist and rationalist; her second husband Flann; her twin sister and born

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“. . . highly recommended for the historic value of the information . . . clear, concise, and well argued.”

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Cuba of the late 1950s was a land of two worlds: that of Batista’s corruption and of Castro’s revolution.

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Conspiracies, intrigue, key political figures, CIA miscalculations, assassination failures, and the top Capos of the National Crime Syndicate—what a story that would make.

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“Understanding the man behind Fox News, how his juggernaut was assembled, and how it is captained shines a new light on news reporting—whether one leans port or starboard.”

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“For the political junkie, journalist, artist, cartoonist, or student, The Art of Controversy is a wonder story of an amazing art form.”

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“. . . one of those fun and usable cookbooks that will be marked, tagged, dog-eared, and dripped on with yet another secret sauce.”

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“. . . his life was really not that much different than ours—except maybe for the endless family secrets.”

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“To Touch the Face of God . . . support[s] the American need for both heroes and villains of biblical proportions to change the world.”

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“If Dr. Seuss is a representative example of its overall quality, this series should be considered for inclusion in K–6 school curricula and libraries.”

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It has taken weeks longer than it should to get through Ann Coulter’s latest book, Mugged—and even then it was difficult to write an objective review.

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“Never screw with LGBT criminals; they’ll get you back in spades.”

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“This is simply a collection of incidents Mr. Green seems to believe are ‘dumb,’ when many are simple errors.”

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“Those who share Dr. Foley’s ‘admiration and respect for the movement’ will find this book invigorating.

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“For those well versed in the world of psychology, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis, for those who are students of Freud, and for those who know the historical players in this game, The L

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When graduate students of Communication study the Ethics of Communication, it is usually in terms of Rhetoric, public presentation and, more pointedly, plagiarism, lying, and propaganda.

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“So sit back, pour yourself a glass of fine wine—that requires time, grapes, yeast, feet, and “an enormous amount of pharmaceutical-grade pseudoephedrine and various beakers and Bunsen burn

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“This biography could have easily been titled The Tale of Two Colberts; however, Colbert’s signature ‘truthiness’ seems to befit the style and enjoyment Ms.

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“I thought I was getting a picture book of politically incorrect satirical cartoons to review.

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“Various committed Tea Party and conservatives questioned are not at all interested in reading Ms. Coulter’s newest work.

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When people meet a man or woman of spirit, peace or national leadership, the reaction is almost always the same; there is an aura about these men and women that exudes power, confidence and leaders

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A golf course consists of 18 holes. Why? Because there are 18 shots in a bottle of Scotch whiskey, one per hole.

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It takes a while for an author to find her place in the ever-expanding world of genres. This is especially true in the world of fiction for kids. E. E.

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When reading the newest offering from an author you have read and enjoyed before, your first hope is that the story will be new and provide more insight into the subject at hand.

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If the title does not get you, the content will. This is not Timothy Beal’s first time at the pulpit and his knowledge of the Christian Bible, or bibles, cannot be questioned.

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“This book answers the questions (of politics and religion) through two broad theses. 1.

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In the world of philosophy of religion, the struggle appears to be between those who do and those who do not believe in God or a supernatural being, and those who take biblical stories as literal v

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Why read a book with a title that would scare the sanest person among us? Is it to prove one is “highbrow” or an “intellectual” or just looking to fool those around him?

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The United States is one of the most religious “first world” nations.

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You know something’s up when the publisher has a name like “Exterminating Angel,” and the book’s dedication page says the author “intends no disrespect. . . .

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“Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope.

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Warning: If any scientific phrase starting with the word “quantum” scares you, if you do not believe Bill Nye the Science Guy when he says “science is cool,” if you could not get through Stephen Ha

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“Get your score card! Can’t tell the players without a score card!” The sounds of summer. In an election year, the sounds of the world politic.

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There is a thin line between whining and problem solving. It is unfortunate that Mooney and Kirshenbaum never crossed that line. In fact, they may never have seen the line in the first place.

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“To our eyes, though, it is possible to detect an obscure but even more compelling reason for the massive appeal of the New Atheism: it constitutes a new and powerful creation mythology that—like m

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Those who follow the world of religion are aware of the Episcopalian “Protestant yet Catholic” dichotomy and the growing rift between its liberal and conservative parishioners.

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Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt, April 2009

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“Insurance is the great protector of the American middle class, but only when it works.” Jay Feinman’s premise is that the property and casualty insurance industry is a profit seeking one that make

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We should all know who Michael J. Fox is. He was the smart, financially driven whiz kid in the TV show “Family Ties.” He played Marty McFly in Back to the Future.

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We should ask a question of ourselves, “Why am I?” We will seek the answer through religion, philosophy, rationalism and, occasionally, a good book.