Nonfiction

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“. . . French Bistro is a book worth owning.

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“For those well versed in the world of psychology, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis, for those who are students of Freud, and for those who know the historical players in this game, The L

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“The target audience is ambiguous, as the coverage moves back and forth between the interests of workers, activists, small business owners, investors, and public officials.

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“Parents fighting to keep band, orchestra, drama, and dance programs alive in their children’s schools need to read The Muses Go to School: Conversations About the Necessity of Arts in

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“Fashions in Eyeglasses: From the Fourteenth Century to the Present Day is a surprisingly informative book, a comprehensive study into this category of what has become a staple fas

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“With The Art of Medicine: Over 2,000 Years of Images and Imagination on your lap, a faraway gallery is made available—a gallery in which the past and the current worlds appear, bo

“Is it necessary to state positively that there is no logical connection between an author’s patriotism, or alleged lack of it, and his or her treatment of historical fact?

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“One on One has a payoff on every page. Any sports fan will have a hard time putting this book down.

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“Nothing about Bringing the Body to the Stage and Screen is hasty or superficial. Author Lust offers the essences of the work in every page.

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“Trading Manny is, of course, about the heartbreak two fans feel when their love for baseball is betrayed.

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“. . . some readers will no doubt dismiss some of the author’s statements as hyperbole or perceive a pacifist bias. But those distractions are few and far between. Ms.

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“‘Heterosexuality is historically constituted,’ she concludes, ‘and for now we believe in it. And this, too, shall pass.’”

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“Deftly weaving economics, military strategy, religion, law, culture, evolutionary biology, archaeology, and history, Francis Fukuyama tells his story from the earliest of times up through

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“The tale of Mr g is about the creation (and the end) of the universe.

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“One measure of an extraordinary book is that it prompts the reader to reframe his or her view of the world, to recognize and reaffirm patterns, to consider implications that might not have

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“Changing Lives gives appropriate credit where credit is due; however, it would have been more engaging had the author given us a more balanced portrayal of the system that is trul

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“There are at least 50 acts whose work is covered in detail, with scores mentioned in passing.

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