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What do an East African oryx, a turquoise-browed motmot, a Malayan tapir, an echidna, and kelp gull have in common?

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Why is an armadillo covered in armor? Just how lazy is a sloth? Why does a beaver chomp through trees? Just what is a binturong?

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“this nonfiction book on electricity touches on nothing factual and goes no further in explaining electricity than the plug and the wire.”

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The color blue holds many meanings both positive and negative. In many faith traditions the color is symbolic of virtue, holiness, or of the divine.

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The new picture book by Shana Corey called A Time to Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech focuses on the story behind John F. Kennedy’s speech about Civil Rights and Equality. But Ms.

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In a striking package of 20 inspired poems and vibrant artwork, Out of Wonder honors the spirited work of poets from a range of eras and origins.

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Chelo Manchego tackles a poignant and universal issue in his book The Want Monsters.

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The new picture book by the late Walter Dean Myers called Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is more than the simple story of a slave’s life and how events and people dictated

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There is a new picture book by award-winning author and Sesame Street contributor and animator Gene Barretta called Muhammad Ali: A Champion Is Born, and it is lovely beyond words.

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Show & Tell Me the World by Tom Schamp is an oversized picture book dictionary with a smattering of everything from houses and food to the four seasons; from air, land, and sea creatur

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I Am Jane Goodall by Brad Meltzer is the latest installment in the Ordinary People Change the World series of books, created to introduce young children to historical heroes. Ms.

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It’s never too early to begin teaching children about the way America’s voting system works, and this is the premise of author Bonnie Worth’s new rhyming picture book, One Vote, Two Votes, I Vo

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Where’s Warhol is an incredibly detailed journey through various historical locations around the world.

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“The fast-paced prose is just as much fun as the illustrations and manages to shine the light on the Great Blondin’s humor as well as his singleness of purpose.”

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Fun and necessity all rolled up in one; that’s the only way to describe National Geographic Kids’ new pocket-sized handbook, 100 Things to Know Before You Grow Up.

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Children ages four to eight naturally ask a lot of “how” questions, and National Geographic Kids Little Kids First Big Book of How by Jill Esbaum attempts to answer every single one of the

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In the Merriam Webster dictionary, the definition of a fairy tale is a story in which improbable events lead to a happy ending.

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Coco Chanel is a fashion version of Cinderella—minus the Prince Charming since she had so many Prince Charmings.

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“What are you saying—that my kid has bad manners?”

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Although this slim and petite volume is supposedly aimed at the juvenile crowd, it must be said that the book possesses a great deal of charm and charisma for those of us of more advanced age.

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Young children love asking “how” and “why” questions almost as much as they love flipping through lively and colorful picture books.

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Suffice to say National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Who is amply illustrated.

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Catalan architect Anotni Gaudí may have been laughed at by many for his whimsical creations, but he went on to become one of the most important architects of the 19th century.

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“Kadir Nelson has created a beautiful, heartfelt tribute to an icon of social justice.”

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How would a five-year-old boy experience the birth of Jesus?

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