Joan M. Burda

Joan M. Burda practices law in Lakewood, Ohio. Her estate planning practice is primarily devoted to meeting the needs of lesbian and gay individuals and couples.

Ms. Burda is the author of the award-winning book, Estate Planning for Same-Sex Couples, Second Edition (ABA, 2012). Her other books are: Gay, Lesbian and Transgender Clients: A Lawyer’s Guide (ABA, 2008) and An Overview of Federal Consumer Law (ABA, 1998).

She writes about LGBT legal issues for various online and print publications. Ms. Burda speaks nationally on LGBT issues. She is the former Editor-in-Chief of GPSOLO, the ABA’s General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Division magazine. Ms. Burda is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, as well as an adjunct faculty member at Ursuline College.

She is a member of the American Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, the National Lesbian and Gay Bar Association, and the American Society of Journalists and Authors.

Ms. Burda graduated from Bowling Green State University with a Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree and received her law degree from Pepperdine University School of Law.

She lives in Lakewood, Ohio, with her spouse, Betsy.

Book Reviews by Joan M. Burda

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". . . a fitting end to the Wiesen Cook’s Eleanor Roosevelt biographical project."

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Susan Quinn’s new book addresses a facet of Eleanor Roosevelt’s life that has been hinted at but never fully developed.

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Reading the musings of a Supreme Court Justice throughout her life would typically generate excitement only among legal scholars or law students.

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Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

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“an interesting and thought-provoking read.”

E. B. White said, “I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world.”

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One advantage of reviewing nonfiction books is learning about people who are often excluded from discussions. This usually happens with historical figures who happen to be women.

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Legalizing LGBT Families: How the Law Shapes Parenthood by Amanda K. Baumle and D’Lane R. Compton is an academic book based on a study that started in 2010.

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The travails experienced by transgender persons in the United States are receiving an increasing amount of publicity.

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Every once in awhile a book comes along that challenges deep seated assumptions and beliefs, upends one’s complacency, and plants seeds of discontent in the mind of the reader.

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The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic by Margaret A.

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The plight of homeless LGBT youth seldom gets the attention it deserves. Ryan Berg’s book No House to Call My Home is one man’s attempt to remedy that situation.

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On July 4, 1866, George Bailey Loring gave a speech. He spoke about the founding fathers, and what they did not do.

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“an erudite and entertaining discussion of the U.S. Constitution . . .”

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“a difficult read because it is so disheartening.”

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Barney Frank came to Washington with Ronald Reagan in 1980. There ends any similarity between them.

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“an excellent introduction to a fun and challenging activity."

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Times have changed in the quarter century since Lesléa Newman first published Heather Has Two Mommies. Twenty-five years ago Newman could not find a publisher for the book.

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“Reading An Empire on the Edge is a reminder that there is more to a story than what the media publishes.”

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“The Bees is a blend of imagination and gumption.

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“This book may put you off your game—if you aren’t careful.”

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“In order for ‘equal justice under the law’ to be a reality, that justice must be affordable for and accessible to everyone.”

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The topic is intriguing: a young woman is trapped in Paris during the Nazi occupation. The publicity blurbs promise everything: youth, war, sex, and intrigue.

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This year, 2013, is turning into the year of marriage equality for lesbian and gay couples in the United States.

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I have two brothers. I cannot imagine what it would be like if one of them told me what Molly Haskell’s brother told her.

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“The book raises questions that are left unanswered. So the reader is left to wonder.”

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“Know a woman graduating from law school? Give her a copy of this book.”

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“Who would have thought a book about the ACLU could be so titillating?”