Civil Rights

Reviewed by: 

“Have Black Lives Ever Mattered? is powerful, disturbing, well-written, and an important book for our day.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Geoffrey Stone’s Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America's Origins to the Twenty-First Century is one of the most importa

Reviewed by: 

"This is a book for everyone who has ever questioned the validity of the “war on drugs,” the “war on poverty,” or any other governmental attempt to solve social ills . . ."

Reviewed by: 

The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

Reviewed by: 

Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

Reviewed by: 

This is not one Till tale but three. When young Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi, in 1955, his death changed the Civil Rights Movement and American history.

Reviewed by: 

Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

Reviewed by: 

"Prisoners," wrote Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, "retain the essence of human dignity. . . .

Reviewed by: 

Don’t talk to police! What? Why not? Law professor James J. Duane tells you why; and if you do not heed his advice, you do so at your peril. Does that shock you?

Reviewed by: 

In the opening pages of March: Book Three, the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama has just ended its Sunday school lessons when a bomb explodes.

Reviewed by: 

“If Americans understood the extent to which policing fails to supervise itself, fails to rid the system of corrupt or corrosive cops, they would likely be shocked.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

American “exceptionalism” has once again become a political headline. Few candidates would dare to challenge the underlying truth that America is simply better than all other nations.

Reviewed by: 

The tale and toll of man’s inhumanity to man is a long, complex, and tragic one, especially when it comes to bondage, slavery, involuntary servitude—call it what you like.

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a difficult read because it is so disheartening.”

Reviewed by: 

“You have to admire their consistent and scientific approach; other commentators basically just wing it.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . an honest portrayal of the battles of a few meant to benefit not only themselves but those who came after them.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a wonderful book that deserves to be read widely . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . stiff, awkward, and confusing with all of its redundant information. . . .

Reviewed by: 

Raphaël Kies is a researcher in political science at the University of Luxembourg; co-founder of the E-democracy center, Switzerland; and a member of Réseau de Démocratie Électronique, France.