Ecology & Environment

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“An excellent, if terrifying, must-read . . .”

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Environmental historian Miles Powell has provided a new and provocative angle to the history of the American conservation/preservation movement through the lens of its racial logics.

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The Shock of the Anthropocene is a detailed, data-driven, and well-argued critique of conventional thought [about the ecosystem] . . .”

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relevant and soul-searching . . .”

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Greening in the Red Zone provides critical research and application that provides a tremendous starting point for catalyzing a discussion about how to heal, integ

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“Neil Shubin is the kind of guy you’d like to meet at a cocktail party: smart, funny, a good storyteller . . . It’s unfortunate that Dr. Shubin . . .

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“. . . 182 pages of bacterial wonderment. . . . Dr. Wassenaar explains how the intestinal bacterial microflora of a fruit fly (affected by diet) drives mating preference.

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In medieval England the violent winds that tore through the woodlands on a lord’s estate brought bounty to the local peasants.

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“. . . one of the truly impressive things about this book is its scope. . . . Despite being dense with data and statistics, Clean Energy Nation never becomes overly technical.

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“Rob Hopkins combines cutting-edge process model analysis with modern scientific data using a pleasantly conversational mode.”

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Bird Cloud, Annie Proulx’s memoir-cum-construction diary is an amuse-bouche of a book, a lovely nibble of a thing, that has, strangely, been inserted somewhere deep in the rich, dense feas

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The wilderness is appealing to most people. At least, most appreciate its beauty and its unknown qualities, if not its danger and isolation.

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Few of us who live “in the lower 48” have any idea about what it is like to live in Alaska.

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This year’s Slap-In-The-Face-Get-A-Grip-Bub Award for business books goes to Jeffrey Pfeffer, business professor at Stanford and author of nine volumes on organization dynamics.