Government

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The subtitle of this book is How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution, so you might think that Donald Trump plays the starring role in it. But you’d be wrong. He doesn’t.

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provides essential inspiration, information, resources, and insights.”

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John Avlon calls George Washington’s Farewell Address “the most famous American speech you’ve never read.” His new book, Washington’s Farewell, explores the history, intellectual formation

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This is a handy little book for anybody interested in political activism, and perhaps even essential for someone trying alone to navigate the endless corridors of federal bureaucracy.

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Reading the musings of a Supreme Court Justice throughout her life would typically generate excitement only among legal scholars or law students.

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Rosa Brooks is a law professor at Georgetown who spent two years working at a senior level in the Pentagon.

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Nick Licata, who served four terms on the Seattle City Council, has written a book that proclaims to help educate people on how to become citizen activists but is rather a more local and autobiogra

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Every once in awhile a book comes along that challenges deep seated assumptions and beliefs, upends one’s complacency, and plants seeds of discontent in the mind of the reader.

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Charlie Savage, the Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times journalist, has put together a wide-ranging and important examination of the Obama presidency focusing on the legal-security chall

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Seven years after the cataclysmic events of fall 2008, when the global financial system all but melted away, we have the testimony of the last of the key decision-makers during that crisis: then-Fe

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On Inequality is neither informative nor entertaining.”

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“readers will find Nothing is True and Everything Is Possible not only unsettling but also difficult to put down.”

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Conspiracies, intrigue, key political figures, CIA miscalculations, assassination failures, and the top Capos of the National Crime Syndicate—what a story that would make.

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“. . . hilarious . . . scathing critiques of American political elites and their reigning conceits.”

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“Many will disagree with Michael O’Hanlon on essential points. But the level of debate is what counts so that our armed forces are supported by intelligent strategic decisions.

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“Could it be that what feeds both ‘dependence corruption’ and excess lobbying is simply overworked Representatives? . . .