Suad Khatab Ali

Suad Ali is from the Emirates, in a village near Dubai. She has lived in the Far East, Russia, Paris and the UK. She was a professor and journalist for 20 years. Now she works as a freelance writer and photographer in the Washington, DC area. Her poetry and short fiction have appeared in Phoebe, The London Magazine, Hobart, The New Haven Review, Found Press Quarterly, Porchlight, Gulf Coast, and other journals. She is currently writing her first novel.

Books by Suad Khatab Ali

Book Reviews by Suad Khatab Ali

Reviewed by: 

“There’s nothing particularly wrong with Slade House but, sadly, there’s nothing especially right.”

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It’s not a bad little novel, by most reckonings, but from William Boyd it’s a disappointment.”

Reviewed by: 

ultimately bores and irritates, rather than pleases and compels. Franzen has a lot to offer, but he needs to stop simpering and whining.”

Author(s):
Editor(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment first appeared in 1866, serialized monthly in The Russian Messenger.

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

charming and vivid if erratic and sometimes offal.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The high point of The Life of Saul Bellow is the use of illustrations.”

Reviewed by: 

“will appeal to the art lover, the record collector, the social historian, the casual observer of culture, and the curious enthusiast.” 

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The Sympathizer has much to recommend it. . . . a serious examination of the tenuous line between civilization and barbarism.”

Reviewed by: 

“a complex novel of impeccable pace, editing, and scene direction . . . compelling and potboilingly readable, a thriller-manqué.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Leaving Berlin is a novel of big ideas—historical, psychological, sociological—if also rather sizeable flaws.”