Roger I. Abrams

Roger I Abrams' most recent of six books on the business and history of sports is Playing Tough: The World of Sports and Politics. He is a leading authority on sports and labor law, labor arbitration and legal education, has served as a salary arbitrator for Major League Baseball and the Players Association and is the permanent arbitrator at Disney World. He serves as the Richardson Professor of Law at Northeastern University.

Book Reviews by Roger I. Abrams

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As a general matter, historians tell the stories of great men (and sometimes women) and the events that made them prominent.

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Great academic philosophers love to write about sports. It gives them an opportunity to opine about issues that average people care about. Why must you follow the rules of the game?

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“James Blake’s book reminds us to keep our country’s ideals alive in the face of the clear and present political danger that confronts us.”

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"Tom Verducci. . . has written one of the best books on baseball in recent years."

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Baseball has served a distinctive slice of the American social experience for over 170 years. It has been the subject of countless fiction and nonfiction books, movies, plays, and music.

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Brian Kenny’s book, Ahead of the Curve: Inside the Baseball Revolution, borders on heresy.

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There have always been fierce rivalries between countries to protect their people and their goods. Enmity has often engendered conflict.

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“Salustri’s guide offers a delightful trip around and through this curious state.”

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We elect our leaders with a hope and a prayer. We generally do not know much about these men and women, except as they reveal themselves during a campaign.

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Fuller’s explanation of the effect of Darwin’s theory certainly will stand as a fascinating example of the impact of scientific work on popular theory.”

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Jack the Ripper wreaked fear and havoc across the overcrowded slums of Whitechapel in the East End of London in 1888.

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“narrative history at its literary best.”

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The Pan-American Exposition opened in Buffalo in May 1901, the latest in a long line of world fairs.

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“. . . in the early 1930s . . . Many thought that [Hitler] could not be taken at his word when he castigated particular ethnic, religious, and political groups . . .

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It is understandable that the public focuses on the exploits of our football heroes both in the professional and college ranks. These young athletes perform boundless feats on the fields of play.

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Jeff Passan, a baseball columnist at Yahoo! Sports, set out to write a baseball book that he hoped “could help a lot of people.” He categorically succeeded.

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Writing about sports, in particular about the historical pathways of baseball, is a favorite pastime of academics.

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Stories about history are listed in the nonfiction category, but the classification is misleading. Historical facts are not neutral truths awaiting discovery and exposition.

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American “exceptionalism” has once again become a political headline. Few candidates would dare to challenge the underlying truth that America is simply better than all other nations.

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America’s favorite sport is football. Although some can remember when baseball was the national pastime, America’s sports consciousness has migrated to the gridiron.

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Those who are members of groups that have historically been subject to discrimination and even genocide—religious, ethnic, and racial minorities—may contemplate how they would react were their wors

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Hans Christian Andersen wrote a fable about weavers who promised their emperor a new suit of clothes.

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“reminds us how fortunate we have been that Ruth Ginsburg came our way at the right time.”

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“the definitive work to date.”

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In 1967, Ralph Cindrich left Avella, a coal-mining town in Western Pennsylvania, traveling northeast on state route 50 to Pittsburgh to play linebacker for the Pitt Panthers.

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Life can be very complicated, and we often seek answers to questions that may prove unanswerable. Facing the abiding mysteries of life and death may require enormous courage.

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Evaluating talent in any line of work is a difficult challenge.

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“There is certainly an audience for such work in the sports field.”

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Race remains the predominant discourse of modern life.

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Baseball historians generally agree on the mainstays of the baseball morality tale. They know that Abner Doubleday had nothing to do with the invention of the game.

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In 1894, Baron de Coubertin, a French aristocrat, convened an international congress at the Sorbonne in Paris.