Christopher M. Doran

Dr. Christopher Doran is a graduate of Boston College and Yale University Medical School. As an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver, he teaches the practical applications of clinical psychopharmacology. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. In addition to psychiatry clinical practice, he has served as a National Health Consultant to three federal agencies and as the President of the Medical Staff at two Denver hospitals.

His book, Prescribing Mental Health Medication: The Practitioner’s Guide 2nd ed. is an international standard for teaching the process of psychotropic medication prescription and management. His second book The Hypomania Handbook has been cited by experts as one of the 10 best books of the decade about Bipolar Disorder. He has taught throughout America, as well as China, England, New Zealand, Botswana, and South Africa on a wide variety of Mental Health issues.

In 2008, he and his wife took a hiatus from their mental health activities to join the US Peace Corps. From 2009–2011 they joined in combating the AIDS epidemic in Botswana, Africa, the country with the second highest HIV rate in the world. Dr. Doran has written two additional books about their African experience.

Book Reviews by Christopher M. Doran

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As the old saying goes, “Close, but no cigar.” When You Find Out the World Is Against You and Other Funny Memories About Awful Moments by Kelly Oxford is a book that tries to put a humorou

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Many readers might assume that a book with the title The Voices Within would be a text about auditory hallucinations, which are almost always seen as negative symptoms of a mental illness.

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One wishes Play Anything by Ian Bogost would have been more enjoyable a read.

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At times, the most difficult but important books to read are the ones that hold a mirror to our lives and parenting behaviors. Glow Kids by Nicholas Karadaras is just such a book.

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At times, a scholarly well-written book will disappoint because it is not what the reader expects. Ordinarily Well by Dr. Peter Kramer falls into this category.

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Sex, lies, deceit, an outwardly moral woman who perpetrates shocking violence, and a gripping courtroom drama to bring her to justice—this sounds like the latest crime fiction novel, but in fact is

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Anthologies by authors that reproduce previous writings do not always make the best reading and can appear unconnected, dated, and stale.

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If you are going to read one book on parenting this year, make it The Collapse of Parenting by Leonard Sax.

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Tales from the Couch is an interesting book and will likely appeal to non-professional readers.

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“Sometimes it feels like Big Brother is watching—even when he’s not.”

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A book with an intriguing title and potentially interesting content sometimes disappoints.

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“. . . conceptualizes the issues of our time and may well be seminal in our understanding of today’s youth.”

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this book will remain the premier anthology of insanity for some time to come.”

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“a must read for all healthcare professionals and a highly recommended read for patients and their families.”

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There are very few books that cover the field of psychiatry in all its complexities and do so in a clear and easily read format.

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“The author takes neither a pro-drug nor an anti-drug stance, simply describing how human beings have repeatedly drugged themselves throughout the ages.”

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“. . . an excellent read for technophiles as well as readers wishing to get a glimpse of the near future . . .”

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“Thoughts about personalized medicine are like gambling at a casino. We anticipate being winners or we wouldn’t go.”

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“Intelligent, accurate, entertaining, culturally relevant, and a little sassy . . .”