Families

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A story of quiet rebellions, resilience and traditions, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane is a remarkable tale stretching three generations and two different count

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 "If nothing else, The Fall of Lisa Bellow is a great character study of someone trying to survive growing up."

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Everyone has skeletons in their closets and deals with problems at one time or another.

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If all of Garrison Keillor’s reports from Lake Wobegon were strung end to end, the result would be something remarkably similar to The Whole Town’s Talking, Fannie Flagg’s latest novel.

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“Winston Groom blends history with a strong sense of place to create a compelling story featuring both fictional and historic characters.”

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What is the definition of the “perfect life”?

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“Dinah Jefferies uses the secrets held by a husband and wife to expose the prejudice and unfairness of the British colonial era. . . . an enjoyable read.”

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Jay McInerney’s reach with the Brightness Falls series is ambitious. In a recent interview with NPR, McInerney says he began the trilogy with an idea of the perfect couple.

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“The Bones of Paradise is everything a Western novel should be . . .”

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The new novel The Unseen World starts out like the 2014 bestseller We Are Not Ourselves, as the haunting story of a brilliant scientist who develops early-onset Alzheimer’s diseas

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Cate Saunders is despondent, but more than that, she is angry. Her husband John, sent to Iraq after joining the National Guard, dies in action, and the government will not offer any details.

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“Over 300 years the forests are raped, eco-systems destroyed, wealth generated, and the insatiable international desire and greed for wood exploited.”

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“Ausubel creates so many memorable, delightful, and poignant scenes that make her novel both entertaining and heartbreaking.”

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Consuming fiction makes us social scientists better writers, better thinkers. We learn how to put together words in new ways, and we learn new worlds.

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“It is astonishing, the beauty in humanity that sometimes accompanies the most hideous tragedy. . . . another hit-the-ball-out-of-the-park novel . . .”

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Gunnar Bishop assumes guardianship of his five-year-old niece RubyLyn after her parents die. Now, in 1969, RubyLyn ("Roo") is 15 and works in her uncle's tobacco field in Nameless, Kentucky.

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Starting in the 1960s and up to today, Mimi deftly weaves her tale, like the best and most intimate of diaries, skipping the dull moments and focusing on those that mean the most to the overall nar

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“sometimes that’s what you have to do—go back to go forward.”

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Kaitlyn Greenidge’s debut about family, race, and eugenics is a haunting coming-of-age novel.

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“It is with these origami-like turns of storytelling that the subtle beauty of the book really shines and makes it that much more brilliant.”

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Europe in the 19th century was the domain of the Habsburg family. With members seated on nearly every throne on the continent, their influence was immense.

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Many girls grow up dreaming of marriage and a family and most times their dreams come true.

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The simple sentences and unspoken words of My Name Is Lucy Barton are deceptive.

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Front Yard is a garden-variety slapstick comedy with elements of farce, witchcraft, and fairies.

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