Fiction.

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 Nobunny’s Perfect is a simply illustrated, 32-page picture book that teaches children about different kinds of behavior and about using good manners. Nobunny’s Perfect uses bunny chi

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Drawn to the hallucinatory, enchanted by the morbid, the gothic sensibility mixes incarceration with necromancy, technology with architecture, vampires with séances.

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First time novelist L. M. Preston succeeds in writing a book boys will want to read. Not an easy task when 12-year-olds are more captivated by a flashing screen than a stationary page.

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Robin Cook’s latest release, Cure, offers the reader intrigue and suspense, as well as in-depth insight into the world of international organized crime and scientific medical research.

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Full and proper character development appears to be becoming a lost art in fiction, but author Christina Baker Kline does her bit to revive the art in the intriguing novel Bird in Hand.

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Horse, Flower, Bird is a most unusual book.

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The title says it all. Shake, Rattle and Turn That Noise Down! How Elvis Shook Up Music, Me and Mom is a true story straight from author-cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty’s boyhood.

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 (Harcourt Children’s Books, April 2009) Grumpy old Ignatius B.

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Fear or faith? When the world comes to an end, how will you respond?

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That ever-exuberant Siamese kitty with the huge ears is back in this rollicking tale. This time, he’s off for an adventure in his spice (um, space) suit to investigate the planet Mars.

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Jakob Sammelsohn hovers on the fringes of central European history, meeting real life figures and becoming caught up in landmark events of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Sometime in the early 1800s, somewhere in not-so-merry old England, doddering old Lord Upton lost his mind.

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 Bloomsbury USA Children’s Books, February 2010 “Zeke’s tree wouldn’t speak to him.” This is one of the most intriguing opening lines I’ve ever read.

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One of the most accurate and inaccurate criticisms leveled at the romance genre is that they are all the same.

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Redemption Falls is part two of Joseph O’Connor’s Irish American trilogy. It is a fictional post-Civil War tale set in the west, most likely Montana.

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Molly Harper has returned with her third installment in the Nice Girls series with Nice Girls Don’t Live Forever.

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If you thought it was impossible to tell a torturous tale about torture with grace, depth, insight, and compassion, then you must read In The Company of Angels by Thomas E. Kennedy.

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Ghostopolis is perfect proof that a graphic novel can tell as solid and detailed a story as a more traditional novel—and the fact that it’s aimed at kids and still manages this feat makes

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Epitaph Road is the latest in a string of successful young adult novels by David Patneaude.

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Beyond Those Distant Stars is science fiction that plays well to a female audience. The heroine, Stella McMasters, is a cyborg.

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Danbert Nobacon, whose penname seems to be derived from an old knock-knock joke, is best known for his part in the rock band Chumbawamba.

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Mary Gooch has heard the comment so many times.

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“I want him brought to me alive.

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