Short Stories

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“The stories in the volume are all worthy—some extraordinary.”

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“a group of invigorating and inspiring short stories.”

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Nobody does Kafkaesque quite like Franz Kafka.

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For dedicated fans of Richard Russo these four stories mark a break with his usual “blue-collar” territory.

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“I had a friend once. Indeed, at the time, I only had one friend. His names was Andrés and he lived in Paris and, much to my his delight, I travelled to that city to see him.

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“astringent observations make these stories an entertaining and compellingly provocative read.”

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". . . rare but brilliant short story collection . . ."

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"Faye’s prose seduces readers . . ."

Writer Michael Sims, on a recent New York Times Book Review podcast, called Sherlock Holmes the “first modern super hero.”

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“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

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“there is a good deal to get excited about in pondering the future work of Chanelle Benz.”

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“I am a refugee who, like many others, has never ceased being a refugee in some corner of my mind.”

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Enigma Variations, the new novel by Andre Aciman, who previously presented us with that peach of a tale, Call Me By Your Name, has been packaged strangely.

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Neil Connelly's sixth book, In the Wake of Our Vows, is a collection of short stories that deals primarily—in often unique and humorous ways—with relationships.

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Midway through Maxine Beneba Clarke’s collection of short stories Foreign Soil, a young family man, Jackson, succumbs to “the grime an the ghosts an the gloom of Mississippi” and as a resu

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Crime fiction and suspense author Lawrence Block has been publishing for more than 50 years, and his latest offering is a case study in the crafting of a successful anthology of fiction: begin with

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Slipping is a collection of Lauren Beukes’ previously published shorter works that shows off her skill across a range of genres.

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“Walker’s stories intersect the tipping point when big city gay life went from carefree hedonism and glitzy self–indulgence to the moment when self–satisfied habitués of the demi–monde bega

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One could compare the artistic career of Clarence Major to that of musical genius Miles Davis. Major has always been miles ahead of other African American writers.

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“Spanning a variety of styles and subjects, Bell’s tales are all told in a distinctly confident and haunting voice . . .”

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On a routine visit to Belgium to buy 20 million pounds of wheat, a Moroccan government official finds his trousers have disappeared.

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On the back cover of Ninety-Nine Stories of God, by (as her publicity packet references) “Pulitzer and National Book Award finalist” Joy Williams, author Chuck Palahniuk (who wrote Fig

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Is there poetry after Auschwitz? Is there horror after the massacre in Orlando?

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What a strange and wonderful book this is. Mashup is a collection of stories, as the title indicates, based on famous first lines. 

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“Rao demonstrates her enormous power, summing up the complexities of an entire life in diamond-cut sharp scenes and dialogue.”

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