World Literature

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Of all Mozart’s piano sonatas, No. 11, “Turkish March,” is the most unique. It’s also his best. And Mathias Énard seems to know why.

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Nietzsche declared God was dead over a hundred years ago, but contemporary readers can’t get enough of religion.

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“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

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Ayelet Gundar-Goshen’s (One Night, Markovitch) second novel Waking Lions starts as a moral drama in its first 14 chapters and becomes a suspenseful crime thriller in its final 11.

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“Listen up, Netanya baby! We’re gonna throw down the mother of all shows tonight . . . Yeah, open up that hook, table ten, set ’em free . . . there you go!”

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Falling under the category of “man drops out of society and goes off to desert to find himself,” this short novel loses direction midway through.

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“There are mysteries men can only guess at, which age by age they may solve only in part.”

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This is an important book; a finely crafted and well-timed, cautionary tale for a world that seems to be slipping back rather than moving forward in how we view our fellow

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“For Oz’s fans and liberal Zionist fiction readers Judas is a required text whose writing is its own reward.”

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Combining an Icelandic sensibility enriched by nature with a cosmopolitan immersion into complexity, this narrative blends a journal with semi-(at least) autobiographical reflections.

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a fable about ideological extremism under an avant-garde skin.”

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In today’s Internet connected global culture literature is written by authors who do not necessarily reside in the countries of their birth and read by readers worldwide.

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As the rare “lady doctor” at a small town clinic in Communist Hungary in 1960 and an ardent partisan who helped her father smuggle anti-Nazi pamphlets during World War Two, when she was a student,

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Originally published in 1966, with the first translation into English published in 1969, this latest edition of Silence has a foreword by Martin Scorsese who is soon to make “a major motio

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Is a proclivity to violence and vengeance a gender and/or regional trait? Are the minds of men more than women and/or rural folk more than city dwellers predisposed to violent acts of revenge?

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Overly graphic sex scenes, frayed emotions, language in translation, meditations on man’s relationship with nature and the cities or town spaces most people live in, modern Spain, government corrup

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Moroccan writer Tahar Ben Jelloun is an award-winning internationally bestselling author who has been regularly shortlisted for the Nobel Prize, among others.

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"If reading about smoking hashish were half as interesting as doing it, this novel would be brilliant."

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Patrick Modiano goes beyond the checklist accuracies of historical fiction, fashioning a lush fever dream filled with glamor, mystery, and despair.”

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On a routine visit to Belgium to buy 20 million pounds of wheat, a Moroccan government official finds his trousers have disappeared.

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At first glance, The Angels Die is a straightforward story about a young man afflicted by crippling poverty who finds meaning in his wretched life through boxing.

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“a well-written story by an inventive writer.”

“She thought about secrets and the damage they did.”

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The biggest problem with Josefine Klougart’s One of Us Is Sleeping is that the one asleep is probably the reader.  

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A decade ago Israeli novelist A. B. Yehoshua caused a public brouhaha that highlighted a hitherto overlooked fault line in Israeli-diaspora relations.

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Michèle Audin's debut novel One Hundred Twenty-One Days is a story about mathematics and love.

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