International Settings

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“a story of loyalty between those who are brothers in spirit if not in reality . . .”

Can a man experience a coming of age after he becomes an adult?

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". . . a beautifully written novel."

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Sir John Halberd is found dead in the Serpentine Lake in Hyde Park, London.

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The Mother’s Promise is a chick-lit tearjerker that nevertheless conveys with sympathy and some depth the stories of four Northern California women who face difficult health and family pro

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As with many great novels that take chances, Monsieur Houellebecq’s latest offering has been overshadowed by controversy, particularly when first published in France, his homeland.

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Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

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“a fully realized and mature work of fiction . . .”

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“amazing . . . original and experimental . . .”

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“Despite the constant rain, the black lava fields, black ocean, endless black sand, and the interminable twilight, this is not a dark novel.”

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“This is a book to be read for the same joy one garners from listening to Puccini’s ‘Madame Butterfly’—again and again.”

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“. . . luscious prose filled with richness, depth, and meaning. Each bite satiates . . .”

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“This is an important literary occasion. . . . The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq is one of the rare books that merits and rewards a second reading.”

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“We Are All Equally Far from Love is not a book to be picked up and put down.

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“There are better Roberto Bolaño novels already out there, but The Third Reich stands up well and gives us an intriguing insight into how their author’s world view was informed by

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“Péter Nadás may infuriate readers accustomed to a Tolstoyan resolution of a series of interrelated stories and characters and times and settings.

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“Umberto Eco is one of just a handful of writers that can be trusted to take me by the hand and lead me into a world that, on first glimpse, I don’t want to venture into.

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“At barely more than 100 small (four and a half by seven inch) pages in Andrew Bromfield’s excellent English translation The Hall of the Singing Caryatids succeeds both as a novell

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