Children

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Claire Garralon’s Black Cat & White Cat is a short, simple walk through a world of visual contrast.

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Bob the Artist is a 32-page hardcover picture book about self-acceptance and bullying.

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Harold’s Hungry Eyes is a deliciously adorable book about a Boston Terrier named Harold whose mind is always on the next meal.

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It’s pretty astonishing that an animal dubbed as “monstrous” and “frightful” could win the hearts of people from one end of Europe to the other, but that is exactly what happens in author Emily Arn

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Avi’s story collection The Most Important Thing brings to life seven very real family situations and experiences that are quite common today.

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“African folktales always invite us to talk about how characters behave,” writes acclaimed author Beverley Naidoo in the foreword to her latest title, a patchy collection of stories hailing from ni

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Megalopolis and the Visitor from Outer Space by Clea Dieudonne, may be one of the most unique picture books out there for children ages four to eight—not necessarily because of its story l

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Animal Parade makes learning fun with its stylish and tactile design as a puzzle book introducing the key concepts of bigger and smaller.

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This unique book is a must-have for art lovers and the budding artist or art aficionado. This book is a mixture of biography, picture book, and memoir.

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Abraham Lincoln: From Log Cabin to White House is an accounting of Lincoln’s humble beginnings in Kentucky to the height of his prominence and prestige as president of the United States.

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“Raymie Nightingale is filled with humor, poignancy, and life-sized lessons.

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“The illustrations are adorable . . .”

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Since her first picture was posted on Reddit in 2012, the Internet has been substantially owned by Grumpy Cat.

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The best picture books are, of course, highly entertaining. It might be argued that when they are also edifying, they become even more memorable. Add in gorgeous art and you have a classic.

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Love from The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a simply told story for three to five year olds that is filled with colorful illustrations done by Eric Carle.

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Heroes don’t have to be big. They don’t even have to be human.

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In Little Worm’s Big Question by Eva Schlunke, a tiny worm who feels bullied and ignored takes a wise little grasshopper’s advice and sets out to find what makes him special to the world.

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Middle school readers will love the Alcatraz series, of which Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians is the first title, originally published in 2007 and rereleased in 2016.

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My Bug Adventure is a funny fill-in by National Geographic that is colorful and potentially very silly. Similar to Mad Libs, funny fill-ins can be played alone or with a partner.

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Valentine’s Day is coming and so is author Eve Bunting’s latest picture book, Mr. Goat’s Valentine.

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Kyle Keeley and his teammates, Miguel, Akimi, Sierra, and Haley are back. Kyle and his friends have become celebrities, starring on television commercials for Luigi L.

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The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor’s full-page, bordered illustrations are composed of bright colors like the tiled floors of Mediterranean homes, adding great depth to these retold ta

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“The Mowgli stories are entertaining and well paced and likely to entrance a new generation of readers.”

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Warren the 13th and the All-Seeing Eye written by Tania Del Rio and illustrated by Will Staehle stands out among its peers in the young adult/children’s category of adventure stories.

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This book is not for the uninitiated in comics or graphic novels of either today or those past.

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