Children

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Rudy, a naively determined and enthusiastically optimistic tree frog, joins the ranks of SpongeBob and Dory as Brian Smith and Mike Raicht team up to deliver another fun and adventurous graphic nov

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The team of Heinz Janisch and Lisbeth Zwerger returns with a revision of Stories of the Bible, originally published in 2002.

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The Cantankerous Crow by Lennart Hellsing and Poul Strøyer is a retelling of a classic Swedish tale from the 1950s.

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Before even opening the book Ship of Dreams by Dean Morrissey, the cover illustration is enchanting, luring, and curiosity piquing, beckoning one to a realm of dreamy fantasy and nostalgia

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Just in time for winter! Cartoonist Chris Britt has created a wonderful, wintery, warm-hearted tale ready for the ranks of Rudolph and Frosty.

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Jon Klassen returns with the third installation of the Hat trilogy.

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Humans have long had a love affair with cuddly bears. Think Winnie the Pooh, Baloo from The Jungle Book, and everyone’s wise-cracking favorite, Yogi!

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“I want to buy a copy.” “It’s beautiful.” “I love it.” These are direct quotes from book club members who saw an advanced copy of Melissa Sweet’s latest biography for young readers, Some Writer

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The Bear Who Wasn’t There is the product of a collaboration between multitalented musician, playwright, director, and author, Owen Lavie, and Wolf Erlbruch, one of Germany’s most renowned

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“Lovely. Simply lovely.”

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The animal shelter summer party is today, and young Tony wants to contribute his panther to the raffle.

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A Well-Mannered Young Wolf certainly delivers.”

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Many years ago, author and illustrator Ashley Bryan came into possession of an “Appraisement of the Estate” document involving 11 slaves, some cattle, and some cotton that were about to be put up f

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In author Andrea Beaty’s lively new rhyming picture book called Ada Twist, Scientist, young Ada Marie begins life as a quiet and unassuming baby who doesn’t talk until she turns three.

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The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles, written by Michelle Cuevas with illustrations by Erin Stead, is unique in its story and powerfully engaging.

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In Armstrong: The Adventurous Journey of a Mouse to the Moon by author-illustrator Torben Kuhlmann furry and meticulous little Armstrong stands on a stack of boxes and cartons each night,

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In the hilarious new picture book called Inspector Flytrap: Book 1 by Tom Angleberger the cerebral Inspector Flytrap is a—well, flytrap.

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In author Mara Rockliff’s enchanting new picture book Around America to Win the Vote: Two Suffragists, a Kitten, and 10,000 Miles, it’s April, 1916—a presidential election year—and two ram

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Randy Cecil (Brontorina) is the illustrator of over 20 books for children. His latest, Lucy, which he wrote and illustrated, feels like a remnant of a bygone age.

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Claire Garralon’s Black Cat & White Cat is a short, simple walk through a world of visual contrast.

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Bob the Artist is a 32-page hardcover picture book about self-acceptance and bullying.

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Harold’s Hungry Eyes is a deliciously adorable book about a Boston Terrier named Harold whose mind is always on the next meal.

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It’s pretty astonishing that an animal dubbed as “monstrous” and “frightful” could win the hearts of people from one end of Europe to the other, but that is exactly what happens in author Emily Arn

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Avi’s story collection The Most Important Thing brings to life seven very real family situations and experiences that are quite common today.

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“African folktales always invite us to talk about how characters behave,” writes acclaimed author Beverley Naidoo in the foreword to her latest title, a patchy collection of stories hailing from ni

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