European

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“great fun and a spectacular read. The story of the Carrion King story is so good that you’ll want it to be real. . . .

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“a delightful book, guaranteed to promote snickers, chuckles, and a guffaw or two.”

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“Glass Houses is a Triple Crown winner for plot, characterization, and setting. . . .

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“Compass educates us, even as we marvel at its obscurity.”

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Nobody does Kafkaesque quite like Franz Kafka.

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“I had a friend once. Indeed, at the time, I only had one friend. His names was Andrés and he lived in Paris and, much to my his delight, I travelled to that city to see him.

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“Free of Vikings, Björk, or enraptured paeans to volcanic landscapes and icy shores, The Outlaw presents Iceland as experienced by a troubled boy.

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“From Italy’s agricultural heartland, largely an autodidact, Walter Ferranini doubts the sincerity of claims for the dignity accorded labor by ideological spokesmen for the post-war communist regim

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Of all Mozart’s piano sonatas, No. 11, “Turkish March,” is the most unique. It’s also his best. And Mathias Énard seems to know why.

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Nietzsche declared God was dead over a hundred years ago, but contemporary readers can’t get enough of religion.

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“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

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Falling under the category of “man drops out of society and goes off to desert to find himself,” this short novel loses direction midway through.

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“There are mysteries men can only guess at, which age by age they may solve only in part.”

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Combining an Icelandic sensibility enriched by nature with a cosmopolitan immersion into complexity, this narrative blends a journal with semi-(at least) autobiographical reflections.

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a fable about ideological extremism under an avant-garde skin.”

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As the rare “lady doctor” at a small town clinic in Communist Hungary in 1960 and an ardent partisan who helped her father smuggle anti-Nazi pamphlets during World War Two, when she was a student,

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Overly graphic sex scenes, frayed emotions, language in translation, meditations on man’s relationship with nature and the cities or town spaces most people live in, modern Spain, government corrup

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Patrick Modiano goes beyond the checklist accuracies of historical fiction, fashioning a lush fever dream filled with glamor, mystery, and despair.”

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The biggest problem with Josefine Klougart’s One of Us Is Sleeping is that the one asleep is probably the reader.  

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Michèle Audin's debut novel One Hundred Twenty-One Days is a story about mathematics and love.

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a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

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“In a suspense novel that is the literary equivalent of Hitchcock’s Psycho, Lemaitre presents a harrowing look into the link between madness and evil.”

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The 19th arrondissement in Paris is a cosmopolitan melting pot district where multicultural citizens live, love, and worship alongside one another, enjoying Kosher sushi and kebabs, and different s

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Oleg Kashin may be a recognizable name to readers who paid attention to international news.

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“Fans of the genre will not be disappointed by this latest Irene Huss novel.”

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