Coming of Age

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After two novels in French Camille Bordas’ first novel in English is a bittersweet gem with wise, witty, and charming appeal.

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". . . the perfect summer read."

Mrs. Fletcher enjoys getting off with the help of online porn. It’s a revelation—especially to her!

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“an adventure with family, love, and destiny at its core, and an authentic and unique triumph of skill and imagination.”

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“an enjoyable feast of nostalgia coupled with the poignant joi de vivre of the teenaged male.”

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When Pete Townsend coined the phrase “teenage wasteland” to describe suburban adolescent life he was probably not referring to such wastelands in an actual geographic desert, but that is what the s

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“Buchanan writes with a sharp and original artist’s eye of her own.”

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It is 1969 and 16-year-old Lucy Gold has never been a motivated student.

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Back in March 2010, when Teddy Wayne took the podium at McNally Jackson bookstore to read from his debut novel Kapitoil, someone in the crowd leaned over and whispered, “He’s so smart—he w

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From the margins of society arise a unique cast of characters who take turns narrating the tale in The Sunlight Pilgrims.

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Being a first-generation American college student is hard enough, but when you throw an international immigration battle right in the middle of your neighborhood, life can get absolutely chaotic.

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“Alison McLennan does a nice job of bringing the reader into her chosen era. With seasoning, she could become a force in historical fiction.”

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“A bracing new voice. A talented lyricist. . . .”

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ANGST and DISPAIR, in all capitals, are clearly the driving forces behind Robin Wasserman’s latest novel, Girls on Fire.

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The publicity copy for Songs of My Selfie: An Anthology of Millennial Stories explains it all:

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“will easily be remembered as one of the most unique and unforgettable werewolf tales ever written.”

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Gunnar Bishop assumes guardianship of his five-year-old niece RubyLyn after her parents die. Now, in 1969, RubyLyn ("Roo") is 15 and works in her uncle's tobacco field in Nameless, Kentucky.

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“Travis Mulhauser hits it out of the park in his first novel. . . . overwhelming triumph . . .”

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“if you like your novels dark and stormy, this one is a winner.”

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The author crafts passages of agonizing psychological self-torment with a master's ear for the perfect phrase.”

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Ask Him Why is a multi-layered narrative with a central theme about the consequences of rushing to judgement without trying to understand the other side by first asking, “Why?” 

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“What meaning does your finite existence have in the infinite world?”

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Among the many different cultural subsets in New York City, there is a group of food elitists.

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Izabella Rae Haywood, teenage heroine of What the Waves Know, has lost her words. She has not spoken in eight years, ever since her father disappeared on her sixth birthday.

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“. . . some very fine writing indeed, . . . I want to read [it] aloud just for the joy of hearing precisely how the words have been strung together.”

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“Office Girl’s target readership, like its characters, are legally adults—even though some may still be growing up.”

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