Fiction.

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Some espionage writers follow the same character from one book to the next— John Le Carré’s George Smiley, for instance.

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The nuclear industry, its dangerous shortfalls and, subsequently, its potential as a target for nuclear terrorism is clearly a subject book editor and author Robert Gleason has made it his business

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“a group of invigorating and inspiring short stories.”

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Tomoyuki Hoshino, born 1965, is one of Japan’s more compelling younger writers, but he remains virtually unknown abroad.

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Artist/Illustrator Jean Jullien applies his artistry and distinct observations on routine life situations in a delightful children’s board book entitled Before & After.

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Camino Island is John Grisham’s much-anticipated 30th novel. It tells the story of the theft of priceless F.

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“a talented new voice in contemporary Nigerian literature.”

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“a complex and seductive page-turner that will not disappoint devoted fans and casual readers of the New York Times bestselling series.”

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Sarah Dessen knows her literary lane and wisely sticks to it.

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Gabe Habash’s debut is a masterful exploration of the human condition and survival through a fragile, flawed character.

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“an enjoyable feast of nostalgia coupled with the poignant joi de vivre of the teenaged male.”

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Jordan Harper’s fast-paced debut novel, She Rides Shotgun, opens with a disturbingly haunting introduction to “Crazy” Craig Hollington, the leader of a gang known as Aryan Steel.

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suspenseful, gritty, well plotted and written, but not a pleasant book to read. . . . ultra-realistic crime fiction.”

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Fans of Japanese literature may notice some similarities between the work of Hiromi Kawakami and that of Banana Yoshimoto, the latter of whom rose to worldwide fame in the early 1990s with the tran

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Haruki Murakami is an author who has never been easy to categorize.

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Somewhere after every NFL Super Bowl one will find many die-hard fans weeping for the team that lost, so it is with presidential elections.

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"Readers, be warned—you are entering enchanted territory."

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This novel tells the story of an unsung heroine of the American century, Katharine Wright, sister of Orville and Wilbur. It is at once heartwarming and heartbreaking.

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Carnivalesque by Neil Jordan tells the story of Andy, a young boy on the cusp of adolescence, who, upon visiting a carnival with his parents, enters the hall of mirrors where he becomes tr

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The Whitechapel district of London’s East End in the latter decades of the 19th century was a popular place for immigrants and the poor working class.

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There’s a log of big in this book: the Big Sky country of Montana, where a big family runs two big businesses on a really big spread; and when the problems come, they’re big ones.

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Nobody does Kafkaesque quite like Franz Kafka.

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“an original and charming story. . . . dramatic, emotional, and ultimately satisfying.”

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“like a sonnet whose beautiful lines are undermined by its flawed argument.”

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"The book is a smorgasbord of rich delights."

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