Logan Lo

Logan Lo is a technology attorney and valuation expert who practices in the areas of Intellectual Property and IT matters.

He provides his clients sophisticated and technical guidance in these complex areas of law and currently practices at the law firm of Woods & Lonergan, LLP in New York City. Mr. Lo also serves as counsel for several e-commerce and international businesses.

In addition to technology law and business, he is also very skilled in real property transactions and is one less than 350 MAI designated real estate appraisers in New York State and 7,430 worldwide.

From 1998–2001, he also served as an associate editor and monthly columnist for the e-commerce magazine, eSecurities, distributed by the ABA and Leader publications; in addition, he has been nationally published in CNET.com and Computer Shopper magazine.

When he’s not working, he writes a well-read personal blog about life in New York City at www.loganlo.com, where he has a loyal and vocal readership.

Book Reviews by Logan Lo

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While one doesn’t have to be a copyright lawyer to enjoy author Robert Spoo’s Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain, it would certainly help.

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“Richard Susskind has the experience and authority to support his very novel arguments. . . . erudite and engaging at the same time.”

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“. . . for law school students—especially prospective ones—it really should be required reading.”

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“Spreadable Media does have something to say—if you can accept the term itself and make it past the first few chapters.”

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“Mr. Arthur . . . does something unexpected in his book: He breathes life into these billion-dollar companies and makes them . . . human.”

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“It’s hard to see how any reader interested in best business practices would not be inspired in some way by Infinite Vision: How Aravind Became the World’s Greatest Business Case for Co

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“. . . as an introductory text on financial topics, How to Speak Money makes what is mystifying and complex for many clear and simple.

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Let’s get the bad out of the way first: This is a terribly titled book. Surprisingly, there are three other identically named books in the world. One suspects they must share an editor.

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“Uncertainty provides a different look from a unique perspective at a universal issue—and thus deserves perusal.”

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“Dr. Benkler [presses], convincingly, that cooperation and collaboration represent a truer nature of people not just on a personal level, but also in society and business.”

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“[Always On] is a page-turner for technophiles, but weaves enough humanity into the topic to keep most readers engaged.”

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The Accidental Creative is full of interesting quotes, scenarios, and observations on both productivity and the creative process.”

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Go to any supermarket magazine rack and you’ll encounter a treasure trove of “list articles,” which claim to give you such things as “The 7 Keys to Losing Weight,” “10 Things You Need to Do right N

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In The Thank You Economy, Gary Vaynerchuk shows why he’s such a popular speaker and author in the business world and one of the top 100 people followed on Twitter.

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In The Power Formula for Linkedin Success: Kick-Start Your Business, Brand, and Job Search, author Wayne Breitbarth deems a user’s profile on the online business networking site LinkedIn a

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James Geary’s latest book on the nuances of the English language is called I Is an Other: The Secret Life of Metaphor and How It Shapes the Way We See the World.

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It’s quite possible that author Jon Rognerud mistitled the second edition to his online marketing book when he named it Ultimate Guide to Search Engine Optimization.

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In Smarter, Faster, Cheaper: Non-Boring, Fluff-Free Strategies for Marketing and Promoting Your Business, author David Siteman Garland seems to be having a conversation with himself (const

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Ralph Keyes begins his book, Euphemania: Our Love Affair with Euphemisms, with a rather dull example from another author’s book.

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The cover of Scott Gerber’s first book, Never Get a “Real” Job: How to Dump Your Boss, Build a Business, and Not Go Broke, has two hands making air quotes around the word “Real.” That give

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If you are one of the people who have not yet read SuperFreakonomics (the original, unillustrated version), this is your chance to pick up an even more entertaining version of the original

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Have you ever thought of the perfect witty comeback to an insult several minutes after the moment has passed?

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The revised and updated edition of The Forest for the Trees revisits the writer’s 2000 book that details the publishing process not just from the view of a published author, nor a book edi

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Few people can offer the type of insight that author Jeffrey Bussgang can offer into the murky world of venture capitalists—or “VCs” as they’re commonly known.

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Jay Greene’s book takes its name from a famous quote by Steven Jobs who said that the iPod’s design is “not just what it looks like and feels like.

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“All I wanted to do in this book was to sell you
on being the artist you already are.”

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As a follow-up to his wildly successful Duct Tape Marketing, John Jantsch’s newest book, The Referral Engine, manages to build on his previous success with a book that is not only

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When The Wisdom of Bees first arrived in my mailbox, I greeted it with a bit of trepidation, thinking that this was going to be another business book shoehorned into a contrived theme.

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Although The New Rules of Marketing and PR is an update of the 2007 first edition book of the same name, it can also be considered as a sequel to Jay Conrad Levinson’s seminal Guerilla

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The New York Times recently had an article entitled “For Photographers, the Image of a Shrinking Path” (March 29, 2010) that detailed how digital photography has changed the world of professional p

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Communication has been described as being what a person hears, not what another  person says.

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Small business consultants know that people talk about 90% of the time and communicate about 10%.

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“The fact is that nearly everyone would be better off with a trust than with a will.

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The latest edition of the Legal Guide for the Visual Artist is more than just the fifth edition of the venerable tome; it is also the fifth edition of the book that author Tad Crawford fir

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In some ways, Jim Collins’ newest book, How the Mighty Fall . . .