Tony Bailie

Tony Bailie’s third novel, A Verse to Murder, is available as an ebook on Kindle. His previous two novels, ecopunks (2010) and The Lost Chord (2006), both Lagan Press, are available as paperbacks. He has also had two collections of poems published: Coill (2005) and The Tranquillity of Stone (2006), both with Lapwing Publications. He works as a journalist in Belfast.

Book Reviews by Tony Bailie

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Bolaño is not a writer who can be read at a purely literal level—or rather he can, but doing so would be like watching a color movie in black and white.

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Javier Cercas is a seasoned polisher of Spain’s recent past, taking a single event or memory and rubbing at it and peeling away the dust of myth that has

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“Often the prose often becomes functional, leaden—rhyming off lists, dates in history, naming streets—but this serves to accentuate the more lyrical passages, the flecks of gold glinting in

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Quite often it is what is not said in this novel that resonates more than what is said.

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“. . . for any true Roberto Bolaño devotee it is a must have.”

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“. . . challenging but hugely rewarding—and deeply unsettling.”

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“. . . an unsettling read . . .”

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“Beautiful prose, tangible emotion, and a constantly lingering sense of dread make what should be a fairly short reading experience an intense and disturbing experience.”

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“There are better Roberto Bolaño novels already out there, but The Third Reich stands up well and gives us an intriguing insight into how their author’s world view was informed by

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“Sjón—deftly translated into English by Victoria Cribb—writes a rich layered prose that, like his protagonist, seems to spring from the extremes of Icelandic dark and light. . . .

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A series of prose vignettes, an extended verse poem and a sequence of short meditations form the three sections of this bilingual collection.

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“There are layers and depths to this short novel that only surface after the last page has been read, and it has been set aside and that leave you reaching for it to start reading again.”

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“Each poem reaches a moment when the mood changes, a moment of epiphany that jolts the reader out of his comfort zone and the everyday shimmers slightly as perspectives shift.”

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“Mr. Kershaw displays integrity in his journalism as well as a passion for music delivered from the heart—both of which lift this story well above the average celebrity bio.”

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“This is an elegant novel, well-paced with dramatic twists, disturbing surprises and richly drawn characters whose actions and motives have a tangible psychological depth.”

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“Nemonymous Night is not an easy read; however—and here’s the rub—it’s entirely readable.”

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Reading this novel could leave you with a huge hangover—the amount of alcohol consumed by its narrator and his cronies is astounding and would have floored even Charles Bukowski.

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Reading Ezra Pound can be a demanding experience as he often slips into French, Spanish, Italian, or ancient Greek—using the Greek alphabet of course.

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The stories of Javier Marías have a surprising tendency to sneak up on the reader again long after reading them.

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Even the most enthusiastic admirers of the late Roberto Bolaño must wonder sometimes if there is really a case for posthumously publishing everything that he ever wrote.

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Dr. Zhivago is a big book, physically and in terms of its themes, multi-stranded storylines and historical backdrop.

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History seems to collide with the present and manifest itself physically in this novel. “Mountain Spirits” and even an occasional ghost also glide through the pages.

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Jakob Sammelsohn hovers on the fringes of central European history, meeting real life figures and becoming caught up in landmark events of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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The subtitle of this collection, Stories from a Village, is slightly misleading, for while some are set in the fictional Basque village of Obaba many of them are not.

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Identity and the way people develop a persona to deal with the world is the main theme of this novel.

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The weather is like a character in this novel, lingering in the background and occasionally being given a few lines.

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On page 66 of this slim novel, a character called Bolaño is quoted as saying: “Tell that stupid Arnold Bennet that all his rules about plot only apply to novels that are copies of other novels.” Pe